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I have the following code in a web worker:

self.addEventListener('message', function(e){ 
        try {
      var xhr=new XMLHttpRequest()

      for(var i = 0; i < e.data.urls.length;i++){
        xhr.open('GET', e.data.urls[i], true);
        xhr.setRequestHeader('Accept', 'application/json');
        xhr.send(null);
        xhr.onreadystatechange = function() {
                if (xhr.readyState == 4) {
                  if (xhr.status == 200 || xhr.status == 304 || xhr.status ==0) {
                    postMessage(xhr.responseText);
                  } else {
                    postMessage(xhr.status + xhr.responseText);
                    throw  xhr.status + xhr.responseText;
                  }
                }
        };
      } 
    } catch (e) {
     postMessage("ERROR:"+e.message);       
   }
}, false);

e.data.urls contains 16 requests which are handled on the UI thread like this:

var replies = 0;

worker.addEventListener('message', function(e){
    replies += 1;
});

Only 10 requests complete, is this because the UI thread has stopped before all the requests have returned or is there something else I am missing?

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1  
comment out the code that sends an AJAX request and simply post a message from your worker. how many replies do you see then? –  akonsu Jun 11 '12 at 11:38
    
16 messages come back with normal postMessage calls which is the correct amount. Must be a sync thing. –  dagda1 Jun 11 '12 at 12:19
    
There is a limit on the number of xhr requests that can be run in parallel. Can you try synchronous using xhr.open('GET', e.data.urls[i], false); ? –  pd40 Jun 12 '12 at 0:59
    
All the requests are being made but not all the responses make it back to the call back. They are all made and all make it back to the callback handler on the UI thread. –  dagda1 Jun 12 '12 at 9:43

2 Answers 2

What is happening here is that your xhr variable gets overwritten in the loop. Due to the nature of XMLHttpRequest, that is, it is asynchronous by default, after the xhr.send(); line execution doesn't wait so for enters the next loop and the xhr.[...] lines operate on the xhr object set up and fired in the previous loop. Depending on whether the previous loop's request has returned (and thus the state change handler executed) or not (which is quite unpredictible) you overwrite either a 'live' or a 'finshed' xhr object. Those that get overwritten before they are finished are lost.

You should make sure you do not overwrite. Do not operate on the same XMLHttpRequest object but instantiate a new for each request.

I moved the definition of the handler function outside the loop. There's no need to redefine it in each loop. It is called in the context of the XMLHttpRequest instance it is assigned to so this points to the instance.

Also, I swapped the xhr.send() and the xhr.onreadystatechange = ... lines. A state change event handler should be assigned before the request is sent (there are several events fired right from the starting of the send) and althought unlikely, a request may even return with a ready state 4 before the line that adds the event handler is executed in the code.

self.addEventListener('message', function(e){ 

    var xhrs = [];

    function handler() {
      if (this.readyState == 4) {
        if (this.status == 200 || this.status == 304 || this.status ==0) {
          postMessage(this.responseText);
        } else {
          postMessage(this.status + this.responseText);
          throw  this.status + this.responseText;
        }
      }
    };

    for(var i = 0; i < e.data.urls.length;i++) {
      xhrs[i] = new XMLHttpRequest();
      xhrs[i].open('GET', e.data.urls[i], true);
      xhrs[i].setRequestHeader('Accept', 'application/json');
      xhrs[i].onreadystatechange = handler;
      xhrs[i].send(null);
    } 

}, false);
share|improve this answer
    
I can see your point but I honestly do not think that is the problem as it worked perfectly on the UI branch. It is only when running on the web worker file does the reported behaviour happen. –  dagda1 Jun 12 '12 at 13:00
1  
Well, the posted version definitely does produce the described 'overwriting' behaviour. Did you try amending the code as suggested? Maybe there's a factor that has an effect on how fast your code is executed and is different in the two scenarios. –  Marcell Fülöp Jun 12 '12 at 13:20
    
I believe, if you make the suggested changes, you will get exactly as many replies as many requests you sent. –  Marcell Fülöp Jun 12 '12 at 13:24

Your example is similar to this firefox example except for the loop inside the worker making multiple ajax requests. I'd be curious to know what is causing the failure. You might be hitting a limit on the number of concurrent ajax connections a single worker can process.

Could you try moving the url for loop to the main gui thread:

for(var i = 0; i < urls.length; i++){
    worker.postMessage(urls[i]);
}

and change your worker to just do a single ajax call at a time?

self.addEventListener('message', function(e){ 
    try {
        var xhr=new XMLHttpRequest()

        xhr.open('GET', e.data, true);
        xhr.setRequestHeader('Accept', 'application/json');
        xhr.send(null);
        xhr.onreadystatechange = function() {
                if (xhr.readyState == 4) {
                  if (xhr.status == 200 || xhr.status == 304 || xhr.status ==0) {
                    postMessage(xhr.responseText);
                  } else {
                    postMessage(xhr.status + xhr.responseText);
                    throw  xhr.status + xhr.responseText;
                  }
                }
        };
    } catch (e) {
      postMessage("ERROR:"+e.message);       
    }
}, false);

and see if that works?


The mozilla example has some error handlers that might reveal the problem. You might try adding in the main GUI thread:

worker.onerror = function(error) {  
  dump("Worker error: " + error.message + "\n");  
  throw error;  
};  

and inside the worker:

function errorReceiver(event) {  
   throw event.data;  
}  
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