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As part of our application, we are using Jackrabbit (1.6.4) to store documents. Each document that is retrieved by our application is put into a folder structure in Jackrabbit, which is created if not existing.

Our DBA has noticed that the following query is executed a lot against the Oracle (11.2.0.2.0) database holding the Jackrabbit schema - more than 50000 times per hour, causing a lot of IO on the database. In fact, it is one of the top 5 SQL statements in terms of IO over elapsed time (97% IO):

    select BUNDLE_DATA from VERSION_BUNDLE where NODE_ID = :1

Taking a look at the database, one notices that this table initially only contains a single record, comprising the node_id (data type RAW) key with the DEADBEEFFACEBABECAFEBABECAFEBABE value and then a couple of bytes in the bundle_data BLOB column. Later on, more records are added with additional data.

The SQL for the table looks like this:

CREATE TABLE "VERSION_BUNDLE"
(    
    "NODE_ID" RAW(16) NOT NULL ENABLE,
    "BUNDLE_DATA" BLOB NOT NULL ENABLE
);

I have the following questions:

  • Why is Jackrabbit accessing this table so frequently?
  • Any Jackrabbit tuning options to make this faster?
  • Is the BUNDLE_DATA value changed by Jackrabbit at all or is it just read for every access to the repository?
  • Is there any way to tune the database schema to make it deal better with this scenario?

Update: The table only initially contains one record, additional records are added over time as decided internally by Jackrabbit. The access still seems to be read-only for most of the cases, as insert or update statements are not reported as being run with a high number.

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2 Answers 2

Is this physical i/o or logical? With the data being read that often I'd be surprised if the blocks are being aged out of the cache fast enough for physical i/o to be required.

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I'm not a DBA, but I would guess that it's logical IO. The AWR report shows the statement under the "SQL ordered by User I/O Wait Time", but not under the "SQL ordered by Reads". –  nwinkler Jun 11 '12 at 13:26
    
One way of clearing that up is to look at the v$segment_statistics view, which will break out the logical and physical i/o for the table and any associated indexes. You can then compare with other segments to see whether it is truly a significant level of i/o across the entire system –  David Aldridge Jun 11 '12 at 14:18

Why is Jackrabbit accessing this table so frequently?

Then it's a sign that you're creating versions in your repository. Is that something which your application is supposed to do?

Any Jackrabbit tuning options to make this faster?

Not that I'm aware of ; one option to investigate is to upgrade to a more recent Jackrabbit version. Version 2.4.2 was just released and 1.6.4 is almost two years old. It's a possibility that there were performance improvements between these releases.

Is the BUNDLE_DATA value changed by Jackrabbit at all or is it just read for every access to the repository?

By the looks of it's the GUID of the root repository node.

Is there any way to tune the database schema to make it deal better with this scenario?

As far as I know the schema is auto-generated by JackRabbit so the only options are to modify the table definition in a compatible way after it's been created. But that's a topic for a DBA, which I am not.

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Thanks for the reply! Updating to 2.x is currently not an option. I have updated my question, the table contains more than one record - initially there's only the root node, but then other records are added over time. This still doesn't explain why this table is accessed so frequently and why the access takes so much time. –  nwinkler Jun 11 '12 at 13:30
    
@nwinkler Then it's a sign that you're creating versions in your repository. Is that something which your application is supposed to do? –  Robert Munteanu Jun 11 '12 at 13:32
    
Yes, we are using versioning as part of the application. So the records in the VERSION_BUNDLE make sense. We are currently digging through the application code to see where the application could be accessing Jackrabbit in a pattern like we're seeing on the DB. The amount of queries against Jackrabbit is off by a magnitude (or close to that) from what we would expect. –  nwinkler Jun 11 '12 at 14:38

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