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I've got a User and Group table with a many to many relationship

_usergroup_table = db.Table('usergroup_table', db.metadata,
    db.Column('user_id',  db.Integer, db.ForeignKey('user.id')),
    db.Column('group_id', db.Integer, db.ForeignKey('group.id')))

class User(db.Model):
    """Handles the usernames, passwords and the login status"""
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = db.Column(db.String(60), nullable=False, unique=True)

class Group(db.Model):
    """Used for unix-style access control."""
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = db.Column(db.String(60), nullable=False)
    users = db.relationship('User', secondary=_usergroup_table,
                            backref='groups')

Now i'd like to add a primary group to the user class. Of course I could just add a group_id column and a relationship to the Group class, but this has drawbacks. I'd like to get all groups when calling User.group, including primary_group. The primary group should always be part of the groups relationship.

Edit:

It seems the way to go is the association object

class User(db.Model, UserMixin):
    """Handles the usernames, passwords and the login status"""
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = db.Column(db.String(60), nullable=False, unique=True)

    primary_group = db.relationship(UserGroup,
        primaryjoin="and_(User.id==UserGroup.user_id,UserGroup.primary==True)")

class Group(db.Model):
    """Used for unix-style access control."""
    id = db.Column(db.Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = db.Column(db.String(60), nullable=False)

class UserGroup(db.Model):
    user_id = db.Column(db.Integer, db.ForeignKey('user.id'))
    group_id = db.Column(db.Integer, db.ForeignKey('group.id'))
    active = db.Column(db.Boolean, default=False)

    user = db.relationship(User, backref='groups', primaryjoin=(user_id==User.id))
    group = db.relationship(Group, backref='users', primaryjoin=(group_id==Group.id))

I could simplify this with the AssociationProxy, but how do I force only a single primary group per user?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The group_id approach you originally thought of has several advantages here to the "boolean flag" approach.

For one thing, it is naturally constrained so that there is only one primary group per user. For another, loading user.primary_group means the ORM can identify this related row by it's primary key, and can look locally in the identity map for it, or emit a simple SELECT by primary key, instead of emitting a query that has a hard-to-index WHERE clause with a boolean inside of it. Yet another is there's no need to get into the association object pattern which simplifies the usage of the association table and allows SQLAlchemy to handle loads and updates from/to this table more efficiently.

Below we use events, including a new version (as of 0.7.7) of @validates that catches "remove" events, to ensure object-level modifications to User.groups and User.primary_group are kept in sync. (If on an older version of 0.7 you can use the attribute "remove" event or the "AttributeExtension.remove" extension method if you're still on 0.6 or earlier). If you wanted to enforce this at the DB level you could possibly use triggers to verify the integrity you're looking for:

from sqlalchemy import *
from sqlalchemy.orm import *
from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import declarative_base

Base= declarative_base()

_usergroup_table = Table('usergroup_table', Base.metadata,
    Column('user_id',  Integer, ForeignKey('user.id')),
    Column('group_id', Integer, ForeignKey('group.id')))

class User(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'user'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String(60), nullable=False, unique=True)
    group_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('group.id'), nullable=False)
    primary_group = relationship("Group")

    @validates('primary_group')
    def _add_pg(self, key, target):
        self.groups.add(target)
        return target

    @validates('groups', include_removes=True)
    def _modify_groups(self, key, target, is_remove):
        if is_remove and target is self.primary_group:
            del self.primary_group
        return target

class Group(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'group'
    id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    name = Column(String(60), nullable=False)
    users = relationship('User', secondary=_usergroup_table,
                            backref=backref('groups', collection_class=set))

e = create_engine("sqlite://", echo=True)
Base.metadata.create_all(e)

s = Session(e)

g1, g2, g3 = Group(name='g1'), Group(name='g2'), Group(name='g3')
u1 = User(name='u1', primary_group=g1)

u1.groups.update([g2, g3])

s.add_all([
    g1, g2, g3, u1
])
s.commit()

u1.groups.remove(g1)
assert u1.primary_group is None
u1.primary_group = g2
s.commit()
share|improve this answer

How about a GroupMemberships model to hold the association, instead of _usergroup_table? A user could have many groups through Group Memberships, and a group membership can hold additional attributes, such as whether a given Group is the associated User's primary group.

EDIT

In order to enforce a limit of one primary group per user, I would use a validation in the User model, such that any attempt to assign more (or fewer) than one primary group would result in an error when the record is saved. I am not aware of a way of achieving the same result relying purely on the database's integrity system. There are any number of ways of coding the validation check - the documentation shows a nice approach using the validates() decorator.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree, the way to solve this is with an association –  urschrei Jun 11 '12 at 14:33
    
@urschrei see edit –  P3trus Jun 11 '12 at 15:21

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