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I have a vector of pointers to objects that are derived from the same base class. The problem is that the type of the original object is forgotten when calling functions (but not methods).

class Cat{
    //base class
public:
    virtual void growl() = 0;
};

class HouseCat : public Cat{
    //derived class
public:
    void growl(){};
};

class AlleyCat : public Cat{
    //derived class
public:
    void growl(){};
};

void function(HouseCat& a){};
void function(AlleyCat& a){};

int main(){
    vector<Cat*> cats;
    cats.push_back(new HouseCat);
    cats.push_back(new AlleyCat);
    function(*(cats[0])); //error: cannot convert parameter 1 from 'Cat' to 'HouseCat &'
    (cats[0])->growl(); //this works though

}

Is there a workaround?

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Post real code, not pseudocode. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 11 '12 at 12:04
    
@ErnestFriedman-Hill also, no return type & not virtual. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 11 '12 at 12:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  • Add another virtual function to Cat as (add virtual destructor as well):

    class Cat{
       //base class
        ~virtual Cat() {}  //add a virtual destructor as well
         virtual void growl() = 0;
         virtual void call_function() = 0;    
    };
    

    And implement it as:

    class HouseCat : public Cat{
       //derived class
       virtual void growl(){};
       virtual void call_function() {  function(*this); }
    };
    

    Then you can write this:

    cats[0]->call_function();
    

    It will call the appropriate overload of function() eventually.

  • Or simply implement function as virtual member-function in the class hierarchy.

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1  
This is a good idea. That function was better off being a method anyway. Thanks for not becoming angry at the mistakes I made in my code. –  albert einstein Jun 11 '12 at 12:59

You can have a dynamic_cast (I'm assuming you left out virtual and that growl is virtual).

Or you can have function take as parameter a Cat&, which, IMO, is the cleanest way.

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Every HouseCat is a Cat, but every Cat is not a HouseCat. So, if you intended to learn polymorphism (from your code, it looks like so), please keep in mind that casting to base class pointer/reference is permitted, casting from base class pointer/reference to sub-class is not easy. You will have to explicitly use dynamic_cast.

However, your code has many other issues other than this. The method growl should be declared virtual, you should specify a return type for it, you cannot call private member functions from outside((cats[0])->growl() will not compile).

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