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I am completely new to objective-c and I am currently in the learning process, I have a parent class A which a property a, I am trying to access the property in a subclass B, When I access the property and assign a value like this

[self a:3];

it does complain No visible @interface for B declares selector a

but if I access it to read from it like int something = [self a]; then it does not complain.

I understand the recommended way to access properties is using the . between object and property, but technically speaking it should work with message style call. but it's not, so please advise me on this.

my code is like this

// Test class A
@interface A : NSObject

@property int a;

-(void) initMe; 

@end

@implementation A

@synthesize a;

-(void) initMe
{
 NSLog(@"I am in A");
}
@end

//-------------------------

@interface B : A

-(void) initEx; 

@end

@implementation B

-(void) initEx
{
    // This line gives a problem as I mentioned above
    [self a:3];
    NSLog(@"In child class B");
}

@end

///-----------------------
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

[self a:3]; is the wrong syntax. If you want to call the setter method, it should be:

[self setA:3];
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but its strange when I want to read a value [self a] works rather than [self getA]. Why this different naming style for getting and setting .. :( – Ahmed Jun 11 '12 at 12:14
1  
@Ahmed You can find all about it here: developer.apple.com/library/mac/#documentation/cocoa/conceptual/… – Alladinian Jun 11 '12 at 12:24
    
Because that's the Apple convention. Never use get..., always use set.... – Ole Begemann Jun 11 '12 at 12:37

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