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Is it possible to write your own conditional statements or overload current ones? (Like the if short hand - ?)

I have done some research and can't find anything. Something I have in mind:

do
{
   //Run Application
}if(...)//Only If variables are initialised

If this is possible, how would I go about doing so in c++?

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1  
Not really clear what you want. Show an example of expected functionality. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 11 '12 at 13:01
3  
If you need to overload if you're solving the problem wrong. –  ta.speot.is Jun 11 '12 at 13:03
    
Some Use case of what you'd like to achieve will make more sense.. –  verisimilitude Jun 11 '12 at 13:03
2  
What would do { ... } if (...) even mean?! –  Shahbaz Jun 11 '12 at 13:03
3  
isn't do { ... } if (...) the same as if (...) { ... }? –  Hans Z Jun 11 '12 at 13:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted
do
{
   //Run Application
}if(...)//Only If variables are initialised

would translate to

if ( condition )
{
   //run application
}

So why not just do that?

It's not possible to create new operators, and it's not possible to overload the ternary operator ?:.

You could mess around with the preprocessor, but you'll end up having less clear code than just using a regular if.

#define RUNIF(condition, statement) \
if ( condition ) \
{                \
   statement();  \
}

and call it like:

RUNIF(condition, RunApplication())

but personally, I'd hate to see this in production code.

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Ok, thanks very much. I see now why a do(){}if(){} is 'stupid' and a simple 'if' does that for me anyway. –  Rhexis Jun 11 '12 at 13:08
    
And yes, RUNIF(condition, RunApplication()) would be rather awful :S –  Rhexis Jun 11 '12 at 13:12

In pure C++, you can only overload existing operators, not create new ones.

That said, nothing prevents you from playing with the preprocessor or your custom preprocessor (like Qt does).

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2  
Not all, for example you can't overload ?:, which is kind of the only one that would make sense for a conditional... –  Luchian Grigore Jun 11 '12 at 13:04
    
@LuchianGrigore I didn't say all, I said you can only change stuff that preexists, not create new. –  Cicada Jun 11 '12 at 13:05
    
That's why I didn't downvote, just though I should clarify... –  Luchian Grigore Jun 11 '12 at 13:05

You can find a list of the overloadable operators here. So you could overload conditionals like && and || (although not recommended), but not ?:

Other keywords like do/while/if are not overloadable, so you cannot write

do {
  ...
} if()

in a way that compiles (sans preprocessor macros)

but you could do:

if(...) {
  while(true) {
    ...
  }
}

note: no overloading, just plain reorganization of code

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Ahhhh Ok. Thanks very much. –  Rhexis Jun 11 '12 at 13:07

In the place where you put if() you could use while and also applyed there condition - just as in plain if, for example:

do
{
   Object x = getObject(); 
}while(x != null && x.getVal() > 12)
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