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I'm writing c++ project, which contains several classes. I created .h file named Position.h, with one array and one function:

class Position
{
public:
    Coord positions[25];

public:
    void setPos(int index, double x, double y)
    {
        positions[index].x = x;
        positions[index].y = y;
    }
};

I want to set values in this array from another classes, so every class in this project will see the same values. I included "Position.h" in other classes, but i can't access the "positions" array.

Anyone can help me plz??

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1  
Can you be more specific about your problem? –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 11 '12 at 13:16
    
just put the static keyword –  marcus hatchenson Jun 11 '12 at 13:16
    
Insert obligitory "globals suck" comment here. –  John Dibling Jun 11 '12 at 13:28
    
As an aside you should make your positions member private, and provide a Coord getPosition(int index) function. I would also change the setPos function to void setPos(int index, Coord pos). And as Luchian Grigore said in his answer, a vector would make this class a lot more useful. –  Dennis Jun 11 '12 at 13:56
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just chnage the statement :

Coord positions[25]; 

to

static Coord positions[25]; 

also change void setPos to

static void setPos

while accesing the array ,access it as:

Position::positions[any value]

But before accessing the array,make sure you call the function setPos

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Thanx, I used it and i think it works, but now i added "getPos(int index)" which returns double, and there is an error while i write "double x = Position::getPos(5)".... maybe in getters it is different..? –  kande Jun 11 '12 at 13:39
    
@kande: No, it's the same. But instead of changing everything to static, take one step back. How many Positions are there in your program, and how many Position::positions ? –  MSalters Jun 11 '12 at 14:28
    
in one class i have a method that sets the values and another class has method that gets the values. for set i used: Position::setPos(index, x,y), and for get i used Position::getPos(index) which returns Coord. it doesn't work. i get an error: "Undefined reference to Position::positions" –  kande Jun 11 '12 at 14:33
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positions is a member variable associated with a class instance, and therefore not a global. You can make it similar to a global by making it static. Doing so, it will become a class-scoped variable, and not bound to an instance.

You will need to define it in a single implementation file.

An even better alternative would be having an std::vector<Coord>.

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Thanx for your answer, but if i'll make the array "static" i won't be able to change it? –  kande Jun 11 '12 at 13:22
    
@kande you're confusing static with const. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 11 '12 at 13:25
    
ye, right... sorry... thanx :) –  kande Jun 11 '12 at 13:39
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As suggested by others, you can make the members static.

You can also create an instance of the Position class as a global variable, and use that:

Position globalPosition;

void function_using_position()
{
    globalPosition.setPos(0, 1, 2);
}

int main()
{
    function_using_position();
}

Or make it a local variable, and pass it around as a reference:

void function_using_position(Position &position)
{
    position.setPos(0, 1, 2);
}

int main()
{
    Position localPosition;

    function_using_position(localPosition);
}
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+1 on this. Position seems like a fairly re-usable class, so you probably don't want to cripple its usefulness by making it static. By having a globally accessible instance of this class you get the best of both worlds. –  Dennis Jun 11 '12 at 13:52
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