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I have the following piece of code in Java implementing dynamic programming recursiverelatio:

public double routeCost() throws Exception {
    double cost = Double.MAX_VALUE;
    for (int l=i; l<=j; l++) {
        if (! (customers.get(l) instanceof VehicleCustomer) )
            continue;
        double value = F(l,j) + (customers.get(l).distanceFrom(depot));
        if (value < cost)
            cost = value;
    }

    return cost;
}

private double F(int l, int m) {

    //=========================== FIRST CASE ===========================
    if (l==i && m==i) {
        //System.out.println(i+","+j+","+l+","+m);
        return firstCase();
    }

    //=========================== SECOND CASE ===========================
    if (l==i && (i<m && m<=j) ) {
        //System.out.println(i+","+j+","+l+","+m);
        //analyses the possibility of performing all the soubtours based at heicle customert_i
        return secondCase(i,m);

    }
    //=========================== GENERAL CASE ===========================
    else  {
        System.out.println(i+","+j+","+l+","+m);

        assert (customers.get(l) instanceof VehicleCustomer);

        assert ( (i<l && l<=j) && (l<=m && m<=j) );
        return Math.min(thirdCaseFirstTerm(l,m), thirdCaseSecondTerm(l,m));
    } 

}

private double firstCase() {
    mainRoute.add(depot);
    mainRoute.add(customers.get(i));
    return depot.distanceFrom(customers.get(i));
}

private double secondCase(int i,int m) {
    double caseValue = Double.MAX_VALUE;
    int k = i;
    while (k<m) {   
        double totalDemand=0;
        for (int u=k+1; ( (u<=m) && (totalDemand<=truckCapacity) ); u++)
            totalDemand += customers.get(u).getDemand();

        double cost = F(i,k) + thita(i,k+1,m);
        if (cost <= caseValue) 
            caseValue = cost;

        k++;
    }       
    return caseValue;
}

private double thirdCaseFirstTerm(int l, int m) {
    double caseValue = Double.MAX_VALUE;

    int k = i;
    while (k<m) {

        double totalDemand=0;
        for (int u=k+1; ( (u<=m) && (totalDemand<=truckCapacity) ); u++)
            totalDemand += customers.get(u).getDemand();

        double cost = F(l,k) + thita(l,k+1,m);
        if (cost <= caseValue) 
            caseValue = cost;
        k++;
    }

    return caseValue;
}

private double thirdCaseSecondTerm(int l,int m) {
    double caseValue = Double.MAX_VALUE;

    int k = i; 

    for (Customer cust : customers) {
        int h = customers.indexOf(cust);
        if ( (!(cust instanceof VehicleCustomer)) || (h >=l)) {
            continue;
        }

        double totalDemand=0;
        for (int u=k+2; ( (u<=m) && (totalDemand<=truckCapacity) ); u++)
            totalDemand += customers.get(u).getDemand();

        double cost = F(h,k) + customers.get(h).distanceFrom(customers.get(l)) + thita(l,k+2,m);
        if (cost < caseValue)
            caseValue = cost;
    }

    return caseValue;
}

Method F(int,int) is invoked from the for loop in method routeCost(). I want to find a way to enforce that whenever the assertion assert (customers.get(l) instanceof VehicleCustomer); ` is not true, instead of going down to the return statement, I want to infrom the for loop from the routeCost() to continue to the next iteration. But F() has to return a value!

I know that what I'm trying to do violates almost every rule of object orientation, but I really need that.

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4 Answers 4

You could throw an Exception in F() and catch it in routeCost().

This approach is much better than using assertions. They are rarely used in practice, and there's a good reason for this: exceptions are much more flexible and better suited for detecting errors, invalid input etc.

PS: When I say "rarely used", I base this statement on the fact that I saw hundreds of thousands of lines of Java code in the past years and I rarely came accross code that uses assertions.

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Why not replace the asserts with if statements? When the if-statements are true then calculate the value, otherwise return the MAX_VALUE of double. When F returns MAX_VALUE the cost will not be updated.

if (customers.get(l) instanceof VehicleCustomer) {
  if ( (i<l && l<=j) && (l<=m && m<=j) ) {
    return Math.min(thirdCaseFirstTerm(l,m), thirdCaseSecondTerm(l,m));
  }
}
return Double.MAX_VALUE;

Use asserts during development to weed out things that should never happen in private methods. (Asserts can be switched off in production)

Throw an exception when something unexpected happens (e.g. a client of your class passes in invalid data).

However, from your question it seems you expect to get instances that are not VehicleCustomer, so asserts and exceptions are not the right approach here.

Peter Lawrey's and Jeff's answers will also work.

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You can return a special value like Double.NaN which you can check for with Double.isNaN(d)

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You could make F() return a Double (instead of double) and return null in the case where your assert fails. Then have your outer for loop do a null check on the returned value before adding it, etc.

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