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When file is created (FileSystemWatcher_Created) in one directory I copy it to another. But When I create big > 10MB File it fails to copy file, because it starts coping at once, when file have not finished creating... so Cannot Copy the file, because it's used by another process is Raised. ;( Any help?

class Program
    {

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            string path = @"D:\levani\FolderListenerTest\ListenedFolder";
            FileSystemWatcher listener; listener = new FileSystemWatcher(path);
            listener.Created += new FileSystemEventHandler(listener_Created);
            listener.EnableRaisingEvents = true;

            while (Console.ReadLine() != "exit") ;
        }

        public static void listener_Created(object sender, FileSystemEventArgs e)
        {
            Console.WriteLine
                    (
                        "File Created:\n"
                       + "ChangeType: " + e.ChangeType
                       + "\nName: " + e.Name
                       + "\nFullPath: " + e.FullPath
                    );
            File.Copy(e.FullPath, @"D:\levani\FolderListenerTest\CopiedFilesFolder\" + e.Name);
            Console.Read();
        }
    }
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1  
I found answer here sorry [This problem solved on StackOverFlow][1] [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/1406808/… –  levi Jun 11 '12 at 14:38
    
possible duplicate of Is there a way to check if a file is in use? –  Adrian Carneiro Mar 31 at 12:35

5 Answers 5

up vote 11 down vote accepted

There is only workaround for the issue you are facing.

Check whether file id in process before starting the process of copy. You can call the following function until you get the False value.

1st Method:

protected virtual bool IsFileLocked(FileInfo file)
{
    FileStream stream = null;

    try
    {
        stream = file.Open(FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None);
    }
    catch (IOException)
    {
        //the file is unavailable because it is:
        //still being written to
        //or being processed by another thread
        //or does not exist (has already been processed)
        return true;
    }
    finally
    {
        if (stream != null)
            stream.Close();
    }

    //file is not locked
    return false;
}

2nd Method:

private bool IsFileLocked(string file)
        {
            //check that problem is not in destination file
            if (File.Exists(file) == true)
            {
                FileStream stream = null;
                try
                {
                    stream = File.Open(file, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.ReadWrite, FileShare.None);
                }
                catch (Exception ex2)
                {
                    //_log.WriteLog(ex2, "Error in checking whether file is locked " + file);
                    int errorCode = Marshal.GetHRForException(ex2) & ((1 << 16) - 1);
                    if ((ex2 is IOException) && (errorCode == ERROR_SHARING_VIOLATION || errorCode == ERROR_LOCK_VIOLATION))
                    {
                        return true;
                    }
                }
                finally
                {
                    if (stream != null)
                        stream.Close();
                }
            }
            return false;
        }
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18  
Hmm, this is straight from: stackoverflow.com/a/937558/97000. –  sharpcloud Jun 11 '12 at 14:38

From the documentation for FileSystemWatcher:

The OnCreated event is raised as soon as a file is created. If a file is being copied or transferred into a watched directory, the OnCreated event will be raised immediately, followed by one or more OnChanged events.

So, if the copy fails, (catch the exception), add it to a list of files that still need to be moved, and attempt the copy during the OnChanged event. Eventually, it should work.

Something like (incomplete; catch specific exceptions, initialize variables, etc):

    public static void listener_Created(object sender, FileSystemEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine
                (
                    "File Created:\n"
                   + "ChangeType: " + e.ChangeType
                   + "\nName: " + e.Name
                   + "\nFullPath: " + e.FullPath
                );
        try {
            File.Copy(e.FullPath, @"D:\levani\FolderListenerTest\CopiedFilesFolder\" + e.Name);
        }
        catch {
            _waitingForClose.Add(e.FullPath);
        }
        Console.Read();
    }

    public static void listener_Changed(object sender, FileSystemEventArgs e)
    {
         if (_waitingForClose.Contains(e.FullPath))
         {
              try {
                  File.Copy(...);
                  _waitingForClose.Remove(e.FullPath);
              }
              catch {}
         }
   }
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that's pretty good way but I need it at once, so I've put the IsFileReady in while and it works now –  levi Jun 11 '12 at 14:50

You're actually in luck - the program writing the file locks it, so you can't open it. If it hadn't locked it, you would have copied a partial file, without having any idea there's a problem.

When you can't access a file, you can assume it's still in use (better yet - try to open it in exclusive mode, and see if someone else is currently opening it, instead of guessing from the failure of File.Copy). If the file is locked, you'll have to copy it at some other time. If it's not locked, you can copy it (there's slight potential for a race condition here).

When is that 'other time'? I don't rememeber when FileSystemWatcher sends multiple events per file - check it out, it might be enough for you to simply ignore the event and wait for another one. If not, you can always set up a time and recheck the file in 5 seconds.

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Well you already give the answer yourself; you have to wait for the creation of the file to finish. One way to do this is via checking if the file is still in use. An example of this can be found here: Is there a way to check if a file is in use?

Note that you will have to modify this code for it to work in your situation. You might want to have something like (pseudocode):

public static void listener_Created()
{
   while CheckFileInUse()
      wait 1000 milliseconds

   CopyFile()
}

Obviously you should protect yourself from an infinite while just in case the owner application never releases the lock. Also, it might be worth checking out the other events from FileSystemWatcher you can subscribe to. There might be an event which you can use to circumvent this whole problem.

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You can use the following code to check if the file can be opened with exclusive access (that is, it is not opened by another application). If the file isn't closed, you could wait a few moments and check again until the file is closed and you can safely copy it.

You should still check if File.Copy fails, because another application may open the file between the moment you check the file and the moment you copy it.

public static bool IsFileClosed(string filename)
{
    try
    {
        using (var inputStream = File.Open(filename, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read, FileShare.None))
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    catch (IOException)
    {
        return false;
    }
}
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Why the downvote? –  Michael Oct 1 at 3:26

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