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My domain model: a uni-directional many-to-one mapping between payment and account.

@Inheritance(strategy = InheritanceType.JOINED) 
@DiscriminatorColumn(name = "ACCOUNT_TYPE")
public abstract class Account { … }

@Entity
@DiscriminatorValue(Account.Constants.BANK_ACCOUNT)
public class BankAccount extends Account { … }

@Entity
public class Payment {
  @ManyToOne
  private Account receiver;
  ...
}

My testcase (that extends AbstractJUnit4SpringContextTests):

@Test(expected=DataIntegrityViolationException.class)
public void deleteAccountReferencedByPayment() {
  createPayment();
  getTransactionTemplate().execute(new TransactionCallback<Object>() {
    @Override
    public Object doInTransaction(TransactionStatus status) {
      Account receiver = accountRepository.findAllByEmail(email1).get(0);
      accountRepository.remove(receiver);
      return null;
    }
  });
}

This is resulting in a DataIntegrityViolationException as the SQL that is executed after initiating the transaction commit, is:

  • delete from BankAccount where ID=?
  • delete from Account where ID=? and version=?

Now I have a strange “feature” when I

  • change the domain to add cascading on the ManyToOne mapping (especially ALL or PERSIST)
  • AND change the test to read the created payment in the same transaction when removing the account

More specifically:

@Entity
public class Payment  {
  @ManyToOne(cascade = {CascadeType.PERSIST})
  private Account receiver;
  ...
}

@Test(expected=DataIntegrityViolationException.class)
public void deleteAccountReferencedByPaymentStrangeBehaviour() {
  final Long paymentId = createPayment();
  getTransactionTemplate().execute(new TransactionCallback<Object>() {
    @Override
    public Object doInTransaction(TransactionStatus status) {
      paymentRepository.find(paymentId);
      Account receiver = accountRepository.findAllByEmail(email1).get(0);
      accountRepository.remove(receiver);
      return null;
    }
  });
}

This isn’t resulting in a DataIntegrityViolationException as no SQL is executed after initiating the transaction commit.

Any idea’s what is causing this behavior? What has PERSIST to do with finding a payment or removing an account? Could this be a bug in the implementation of the JPA standard? Btw, I’m using JPA2 together with Hibernate 4.1.3.Final.

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1 Answer 1

By reading in a Payment object it becomes managed. When you remove the Account and call commit, the JPA provider then finds that same exact Account object referenced from the managed Payment, and because the relationship is marked cascade persist, must persist the Account. So the net effect is it cancels out your remove attempt.

JPA requires maintaining relationships so that your object model reflects what you want the database to look like. In this case you must remove the Account reference from the Payment before it can be deleted, or delete the payment in the same transaction.

share|improve this answer
    
Thx! However the jpa2 specification is still confusing me. Your explanation matches to the last bulletpoint in section 3.2.2. However it not clear to me why the persist is called on the referenced Account. I indeed specified cascade=PERSIST, but I'm finding it strange why the persist operation is cascaded to Account as I'm not calling the persist operation on Payment. –  Peter Bollen Jun 12 '12 at 8:17
    
Problem solved. The flush() operation was applying the persist() operation to Account. The spec states: The semantics of the flush operation, applied to an entity X are as follows: If X is a managed entity, it is synchronized to the database. For all entities Y referenced by a relationship from X, if the relationship to Y has been annotated with the cascade element value cascade=PERSIST or cas- cade=ALL, the persist operation is applied to Y. Hope this helps somebody. –  Peter Bollen Jun 12 '12 at 8:53

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