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I am trying to use a static const field which I define inside a class.
When I define it like that:

class DisjunctionQuery : public Query
{

  public:
    DisjunctionQuery ();
    static const std::string prefix;


};
const std::string DisjunctionQuery::prefix = "Or";

It says: multiple definition of 'DisjunctionQuery::prefix' and if I change it that way (remove the two lines):

class DisjunctionQuery : public Query
{

  public:
    DisjunctionQuery ();
    //static const std::string prefix;


};
//const std::string DisjunctionQuery::prefix = "Or";

It says when I try to call it in another place 'prefix' is not a member of 'DisjunctionQuery'.

How can I make it work? thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You move the definition to a single implementation file.

If you keep it in the header, you'll break the one definition rule. Each file that includes the header will attempt to define the static member, which is wrong.

//DisjunctionQuery.h
class DisjunctionQuery : public Query
{
  public:
    //....
    static const std::string prefix;
};

//DisjunctionQuery.cpp
#include "DisjunctionQuery.h"
const std::string DisjunctionQuery::prefix = "Or";
share|improve this answer
    
s/will attempt to define/will attempt to implement/. The definition is within the class definition; the multiple-implementation scenario is the problem. –  cdhowie Jun 11 '12 at 15:05
    
@cdhowie no, that's just a declaration. Also, there's no implementation for data members, only for functions. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 11 '12 at 15:06
    
You assume tomer doesn't add include guards. –  user1417475 Jun 11 '12 at 15:08
    
@user1417475 include guards don't matter. I'm talking about inclusion in multiple translation units, so include guards are irrelevant. –  Luchian Grigore Jun 11 '12 at 15:08

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