Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing a simple wrapper-class for scanning a stream of characters character-by-character.

Scanner scanner("Hi\r\nYou!");
const char* current =  scanner.cchar();
while (*current != 0) {
    printf("Char: %d, Column: %d, Line: %d\n", *current, scanner.column(), scanner.line());
    current = scanner.read();
}

C:\Users\niklas\Desktop>g++ main.cpp -o main.exe
C:\Users\niklas\Desktop>main.exe
Char: 72, Column: 0, Line: 0
Char: 105, Column: 1, Line: 0
Char: 13, Column: 0, Line: 1
Char: 10, Column: 0, Line: 2
Char: 89, Column: 1, Line: 2
Char: 111, Column: 2, Line: 2
Char: 117, Column: 3, Line: 2
Char: 33, Column: 4, Line: 2

This example already shows the problem I'm stuck with. One can interpret \r as a new-line, as well as \n. But together (\r\ n) they are just a single new-line as well!

The function that processes line- and column-numbers is this:

void _processChar(int revue) {
    char chr = _source[_position];
    if (chr == '\r' or chr == '\n') {
        _line += revue;
        _column = 0;
    }
    else {
        _column += revue;
    }
}

Sure, I could just look at the character that appears after the character at the current position, but: I do not check for NULL-termination on the source because I want to be able to process character streams that may contain \0 characters without being terminated at that point.

How can I handle CRLF this way?

Edit 1: DOH! This seems to be working fine. Is this safe in any case or do I have an issue somewhere?

void _processChar(int revue) {
    char chr = _source[_position];

    bool is_newline = (chr == '\r' or chr == '\n');
    if (chr == '\n' and _position > 0) {
        is_newline = (_source[_position - 1] != '\r');
    }

    if (is_newline) {
        _line += revue;
        _column = 0;
    }
    else {
        _column += revue;
    }
}

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Just ignore \r and count \n as a newline. All modern computers do it this way (including Windows and Mac). –  Seth Carnegie Jun 11 '12 at 15:24
    
Windows notepad does only interpret \r\n as new-line (on Windows 7 here) –  Niklas R Jun 11 '12 at 15:29
    
@Seth “Be conservative in what you produce, liberal in what you accept.” –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 11 '12 at 15:29
    
@SethCarnegie: That would give you a (very) wrong answer on systems that use only \r though. –  Mehrdad Jun 11 '12 at 15:32
1  
@NiklasR It doesn't really matter what notepad does. –  Seth Carnegie Jun 11 '12 at 16:07

4 Answers 4

Most modern systems handle \n as the the newline for the current target platform so all of that should happen automatically for you if you just check for \n.

share|improve this answer
    
That depends on what you want and what and where the text is coming from. The i/o systems in C and C++ will translate the host's newline sequence to '\n'. If you got the text some other way, or if you're trying to count lines in a file that's not native to the host system, you cannot rely on that translation. –  Adrian McCarthy Jun 11 '12 at 17:49

You may need to keep state inside your stream wrapper -- a stateless wrapper, as you've noticed, simply cannot do this, because every output can (by definition) depend on the previous output.

share|improve this answer

Your _processChar doesn’t appear to increment the stream read position. Once you change that, you can implement the full newline check:

void _processChar(int revue) {
    char chr = _source[_position];
    if (chr != '\r' and chr != '\n') {
        _column += revue;
        return;
    }
    if (if chr == '\r' and _source[_position + 1] == '\n')
        ++_position;
    _line += revue;
    _column = 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
_processChar is not intended to increment the position. :) As stated above, I want to be able to process not null-terminated strings as well. The memory at _source[_position + 1] may already be not part of the parsed source. Stopping the scanning-process at the correct point is left to the user of the class. –  Niklas R Jun 11 '12 at 15:31
    
@NiklasR Effectively, you then cannot handle it, since "\r\n" simply isn’t a single-char token. You need to change your logic to handle it. –  Konrad Rudolph Jun 11 '12 at 15:32
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This seems legit to me:

void _processChar() {
    char chr = _source[_position];

    // Treat CRLF as a single new-line
    bool is_newline = (chr == '\r' or chr == '\n');
    if (chr == '\n' and _position > 0) {
        is_newline = (_source[_position - 1] != '\r');
    }

    if (is_newline) {
        _line += 1;
        _column = 0;
    }
    else {
        _column += 1;
    }
}

At the point where a \n is processed, it checks whether the previous character is carriage return (\r). If so, the line-number is not increased.

Also, before it checks the previous character, it tests whether there is actually a previous character (and _position > 0).

I've removed the int revue argument as I just noticed that what I wanted to achieve is not possible they way I tried to achieve it. I wanted to be able to go backwards in the source, but I can not retrieve the column-number from the previous line then.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.