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Update: Is there a way to achieve what I'm trying to do in an IoC framework other than Windsor? Windsor will handle the controllers fine but won't resolve anything else. I'm sure it's my fault but I'm following the tutorial verbatim and objects are not resolving with ctor injection, they are still null despite doing the registers and resolves. I've since scrapped my DI code and have manual injection for now because the project is time sensitive. Hoping to get DI worked out before deadline.


I have a solution that has multiple classes that all implement the same interface

As a simple example, the Interface

public interface IMyInterface {
    string GetString();
    int GetInt();
   ...
}

The concrete classes

public class MyClassOne : IMyInterface {
    public string GetString() {
        ....
    }
    public int GetInt() {
        ....
    }
}

public class MyClassTwo : IMyInterface {
    public string GetString() {
        ....
    }
    public int GetInt() {
        ....
    }
}

Now these classes will be injected where needed into layers above them like:

public class HomeController {

    private readonly IMyInterface myInterface;

    public HomeController() {}

    public HomeController(IMyInterface _myInterface) {
        myInterface = _myInterface
    }
    ...
}

public class OtherController {

    private readonly IMyInterface myInterface;

    public OtherController() {}

    public OtherController(IMyInterface _myInterface) {
        myInterface = _myInterface
    }
    ...
}

Both controllers are getting injected with the same interface.

When it comes to resolving these interfaces with the proper concrete class in my IoC, how do I differentiate that HomeController needs an instance of MyClassOne and OtherController needs an instance of MyClassTwo?

How do I bind two different concrete classes to the same interface in the IoC? I don't want to create 2 different interfaces as that breaks the DRY rule and doesn't make sense anyway.

In Castle Windsor I would have 2 lines like this:

container.Register(Component.For<IMyInterface>().ImplementedBy<MyClassOne>());
container.Register(Component.For<IMyInterface>().ImplementedBy<MyClassTwo>());

This won't work because I will only ever get a copy of MyClassTwo because it's the last one registered for the interface.

Like I said, I don't get how I can do it without creating specific interfaces for each concrete, doing that breaks not only DRY rules but basic OOP as well. How do I achieve this?


Update based on Mark Polsen's answer


Here is my current IoC, where would the .Resolve statements go? I don' see anything in the Windsor docs

public class Dependency : IDependency {

    private readonly WindsorContainer container = new WindsorContainer();

    private IDependency() {
    }

    public IDependency AddWeb() {
        ...

        container.Register(Component.For<IListItemRepository>().ImplementedBy<ProgramTypeRepository>().Named("ProgramTypeList"));
        container.Register(Component.For<IListItemRepository>().ImplementedBy<IndexTypeRepository>().Named("IndexTypeList"));

        return this;
    }

    public static IDependency Start() {
        return new IDependency();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
You can bind directly to the concrete classes if necessary. (well, at least with Ninject you can but I can't imagine you can't do it with other dips.) –  BuildStarted Jun 11 '12 at 15:53
    
You do not want to do that. The dependencies of your classes is ambiguous. You can't just look at one of the classes and tell that it need a specific implementation. I recommend that you use a factory as a dependency in both classes instead. Read more here: codeproject.com/Articles/386164/… –  jgauffin Jun 12 '12 at 5:26
    
@jgauffin The promise of Windsor's .Named(...) method is that it can resolve that ambiguity, but in actual use, I can't get Windsor to resolve anything :-( –  CD Smith Jun 12 '12 at 11:18
    
You don't get me. You can't tell by looking at the class constructor that a specific implementation is required. It's sort of a Liskovs Substitution Principle violation. –  jgauffin Jun 12 '12 at 11:47
    
@jgauffin I understand that completely. That's the whole idea of OOP, being able to accept a base and provide more specific implementation. But either way, like I said, I can't get Windsor to resolve anything, not just these classes that have ambiguity. –  CD Smith Jun 12 '12 at 11:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You should be able to accomplish it with named component registration.

container.Register(Component.For<IMyInterface>().ImplementedBy<MyClassOne>().Named("One"));
container.Register(Component.For<IMyInterface>().ImplementedBy<MyClassTwo>().Named("Two"));

and then resolve them with

kernel.Resolve<IMyInterface>("One");

or

kernel.Resolve<IMyInterface>("Two");

See: To specify a name for the component

share|improve this answer
    
This looks promising! –  CD Smith Jun 11 '12 at 16:03
    
I'm working off of a sample app that uses Castle Windsor, it uses the container.Register(... lines but it doesn't use any container.Resolve... anywhere. Is there a specific place that container.Resolve... goes or just right there after .Register? –  CD Smith Jun 11 '12 at 16:12
    
Sorry, instead of container, it should be kernel, where kernal is IKernel type. –  Mark Polsen Jun 11 '12 at 16:33
    
I updated my question with my current IoC, it is in a separate assembly from my MVC UI and it currently does not have a Kernel object.. where does that come from? –  CD Smith Jun 11 '12 at 16:36
    
You should be able to call Resolve from your container instance. It doesn't necessarily have to come from the MicroKernel instance. –  Mark Polsen Jun 11 '12 at 17:25

I hope you can use service overrides.

Ex.

container.Register(
    Component.For<IMyService>()
        .ImplementedBy<MyServiceImpl>()
        .Named("myservice.default"),
    Component.For<IMyService>()
        .ImplementedBy<OtherServiceImpl>()
        .Named("myservice.alternative"),

    Component.For<ProductController>()
        .ServiceOverrides(ServiceOverride.ForKey("myService").Eq("myservice.alternative"))
);

public class ProductController
{
    // Will get a OtherServiceImpl for myService.
    // MyServiceImpl would be given without the service override.
    public ProductController(IMyService myService)
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This looks promising as well! –  CD Smith Jun 11 '12 at 16:03
    
This one doesn't quite work for me as my IoC is not in the MVC UI layer so I can't use Component.For<ProductController>() as I would have to reference the UI assembly and that will cause a circular reference. –  CD Smith Jun 11 '12 at 16:33

Typically DI containers follow Register, Resolve and Release patterns. During the register phase there are two steps. The first is to specify the mapping as you are doing. The second step is to specify the rules which govern which to inject where.

This problem is very common when we try to address Cross cutting concerns using decorators. In these situations, you have multiple classes(decorators) implementing a single interface.

Briefly, we need to implement IModelInterceptorsSelector which allows you to write imperative code that decides which Interceptor to apply to which types or members.

This is elaborately described in the book Dependency Injection in .Net book by Mark Seemann. Look for chapter 9 interception or search for the above interface.

I am not an expert at this, but was searching for the exact same problem and found the ans in the above book.

Hope this helps.

Regards Dev1

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