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I'm using ASP.NET MVC2 and jQuery to load and save objects. I'm using knockout.js's object serilization/deserialization to safely maintain the object's data structure when loading/saving data.

When I send back my object in its exact structure back to the server using the following JavaScript method, on the server side in ASP.NET, my GraduationClass object gets instantiated but it has none of the data.

I checked the post data in firebug, and all of the data is properly being sent back to the server in the request in the correct structure, yet the ASP.NET MVC internal pipeline is failing to deserialize the data back into the GraduationClass object. I tried this both with and without the contentType setting.

I'm wondering what I'm doing incorrectly.

// javascript save method
function save(graduationClass) {
    $.ajax({
        url: "/SiteManagement/saveGraduationClass",
        type: "POST",
        // data: ko.mapping.toJSON(graduationClass), // (solution 1)
        data: graduationClass, // (solution 2)
        contentType: "application/json; charset=utf-8",
        dataType: "json",            
        success: function(data) {            
    });    
}

// both solutions result in a blank object construction on the server side

// ASP.NET MVC2 AJAX method
[HttpPost]               
public ActionResult saveGraduationClass(GraduationClass graduationClass) {
    // graduationClass here has all default data rather than the data sent in the post
    return Json(new { resultText = "success" }, JsonRequestBehavior.AllowGet);
}
share|improve this question
    
I actually changed the post to the much simpler $.post("/SiteManagement/saveGraduationClass", { graduationClass: graduationClass }, function(data) { // code goes here }); -- and still get the same result. –  Adam Levitt Jun 11 '12 at 16:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I believe there are two possible problem.

First, I'm pretty sure when you specify that you are sending JSON in an Ajax request, jQuery will Serialize Javascript Objects passed in the data parameter. You are definitely creating an jQuery object with a property json with a value of a string (I believe, I'm not familar with knockout). The value being passed to MVC would then look like:

{
  json : 'string of graduationClass data '
}

Which is of sorts a double serialization.

The second problem is, the previous JSON does not match your saveGraduationClass method parameter graduationClass.

I think either of these solutions should work:

data: ko.toJSON(graduationClass),  // knockout.js utility method

or

data: graduationClass,  // let jQuery serialize the object.

Update

If I have this class:

public class Person
{
  public string Name { get; set; } 
}

and I have this JSON:

{
  Name : 'Jon Doe'
}

then it will populate this method:

public ActionResult SomeMethod(Person person)

However, the following JSON will not work:

{
  json : '{ Name : "Jon Doe" }'
}

It will also not match:

{
  json :
  {
    Name : 'Jon Doe'
  }
}

The layout of the JSON needs to match exactly the layout of the class trying to be populated.

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is definitely in the right direction. Not having the graduation class as the named parameter seemed like a mistake. Knockout.js's toJSON method leaves in the extra mapping data that it puts in there so I need to figure out if I can remove it. Will the serialization in ASP.NET MVC not work if the object is not an exact match? Or will it ignore unrecognized fields? –  Adam Levitt Jun 11 '12 at 16:37
    
The logic is pretty simple, it needs to match. –  Erik Philips Jun 11 '12 at 16:42
    
With the ko.mapping.toJSON(graduationClass), I have an exact structure match now... However, while the GraduationClass object is getting instantiated, it still has only default data values. I just confirmed that the json is an EXACT match on the load and on the save. –  Adam Levitt Jun 11 '12 at 16:48
1  
As I stated previously, you are encapsulating your toJSON in another jquery object doing, essentially doing double serialization. Please try first solution I posted. –  Erik Philips Jun 11 '12 at 16:51
    
Erik - thanks again for the assistance. I modified the original post with my interpretation of both of your solutions. However, I'm still getting a blank graduationClass being passed into the saveGraduationClass method on the server side. –  Adam Levitt Jun 11 '12 at 16:55

Hi I think that the problem could be in the default JsonValueProvider, but you can write a custom one:

public sealed class JsonDotNetValueProviderFactory : ValueProviderFactory
    {          

        private static void AddToBackingStore(Dictionary<string, object> backingStore, string prefix, object value)
        {
            IDictionary<string, object> d = value as IDictionary<string, object>;
            if (d != null)
            {
                foreach (KeyValuePair<string, object> entry in d)
                {
                    AddToBackingStore(backingStore, MakePropertyKey(prefix, entry.Key), entry.Value);
                }
                return;
            }

            IList l = value as IList;
            if (l != null)
            {
                for (int i = 0; i < l.Count; i++)
                {
                    AddToBackingStore(backingStore, MakeArrayKey(prefix, i), l[i]);
                }
                return;
            }

            // primitive
            backingStore[prefix] = value;
        }

        private static object GetDeserializedObject(ControllerContext controllerContext)
        {
            if (!controllerContext.HttpContext.Request.ContentType.StartsWith("application/json", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase))
            {
                // not JSON request
                return null;
            }

            StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(controllerContext.HttpContext.Request.InputStream);
            string bodyText = reader.ReadToEnd();
            if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(bodyText))
            {
                // no JSON data
                return null;
            }

            object jsonData = new JavaScriptSerializer().DeserializeObject(bodyText);
            return jsonData;
        }

        public override IValueProvider GetValueProvider(ControllerContext controllerContext)
        {
            if (controllerContext == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException("controllerContext");
            }

            object jsonData = GetDeserializedObject(controllerContext);
            if (jsonData == null)
            {
                return null;
            }

            Dictionary<string, object> backingStore = new Dictionary<string, object>(StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
            AddToBackingStore(backingStore, String.Empty, jsonData);
            return new DictionaryValueProvider<object>(backingStore, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture);
        }

        private static string MakeArrayKey(string prefix, int index)
        {
            return prefix + "[" + index.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture) + "]";
        }

        private static string MakePropertyKey(string prefix, string propertyName)
        {
            return (String.IsNullOrEmpty(prefix)) ? propertyName : prefix + "." + propertyName;
        }


    }

Then add this into the Application_Start in Global.asax:

    ValueProviderFactories.Factories.Remove(ValueProviderFactories.Factories.OfType<JsonValueProviderFactory>().FirstOrDefault());
ValueProviderFactories.Factories.Add(new JsonDotNetValueProviderFactory());

This example is using Json.NET

Also is better to use ko.mapping plugin ko.mapping, because your graduationClass could be observable object:

var jsonModel = ko.mapping.toJSON(graduationClass);

                    $.ajax({
                        url: '/SiteManagement/saveGraduationClass',
                        type: 'POST',
                        dataType: 'json',
                        data: jsonModel,
                        contentType: 'application/json; charset=utf-8',
                        success: function (data) {
                            // get the result and do some magic with it                            
                        }
                    });
share|improve this answer
    
ko.mapping.toJSON(graduationClass) - this is helpful. However, for some reason, while the object is not coming in as null (a good thing), it is just missing the data. –  Adam Levitt Jun 11 '12 at 16:47
1  
@AdamLevitt Did you try to replace the value provider? –  MajoB Jun 11 '12 at 17:02
    
Trying that now... though it seems like an awfully large hoop to jump through. –  Adam Levitt Jun 11 '12 at 17:03
    
So this is a big step in the proper direction, but it leaves me with a few issues. 1. It's not serializing the standard JSON date format properly (such as /Date(1335412800000)/). 2. What other repercussions might this have? 3. Why is this required as opposed to something out of the box? –  Adam Levitt Jun 11 '12 at 17:09
    
This was the best solution for me: prefix.teddywino.com/post/… –  Adam Levitt Jun 11 '12 at 21:27

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