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While trying out jQuery, I have a question that is probably a newbie mistake, but I cannot seem to find the solution. This is the code:

$.get("index.html", function() {
    var i = 0;
    for (; i < 3; i++)
    {
        var lDiv = document.createElement('div');
        lDiv.id = 'body-' + i;
        document.getElementById('body').appendChild(lDiv);
        $.get('index.html', function(data) {
            lDiv.innerHTML = "<p>Hello World " + i + "</p>";
        });
    }
});

The output seems to be

<div id='body-0'></div>
<div id='body-1'></div>
<div id='body-2'>
    <p>Hello World 3</p>
</div>

I expected the lDiv.innerHTML= code to be executed for each i, but apparently it is only executed for the last i? What am I overlooking?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This happens because the loop completes (i is 2) before any of the callbacks are fired.

@thecodeparadox's solution works, but it serializes the HTTP requests. (Makes them fire one-at-a-time.) This allows the requests to execute in parallel, and thus quicker:

for (var i = 0; i < 3; i++)
{
    var lDiv = document.createElement('div');
    lDiv.id = 'body-' + i;
    document.getElementById('body').appendChild(lDiv);
    $.get('index.html', function(i,lDiv) { // the current iteration's `i` and `lDiv` are captured...
        return function(data) {
            lDiv.innerHTML = "<p>Hello World " + i + "</p>";
        }
    }(i,lDiv)); // ...by passing them as an argument to the self-executing function
}
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I like this solution better, but I had to change it a little bit to also capture the lDiv. Thanks! –  Kristof Van Landschoot Jun 12 '12 at 8:55

As $.get() is asynchronous, so you need to execute your append and next call within $.get()'s success() callback function.

var i = 0;
function recursiveLoad() {
       if(i == 3) return;
       var lDiv = document.createElement('div');
       lDiv.id = 'body-' + i;
       document.getElementById('body').appendChild(lDiv);
       $.get('index.html', function(data) {
            lDiv.innerHTML = "<p>Hello World " + i + "</p>";
            i++;
            recursiveLoad();
       });
}
// initial call
recursiveLoad();
share|improve this answer
    
Works! I was assuming iOS-blocks-style copying of local variables in the callback-function, which is where my thinking went wrong. Thanks for this! –  Kristof Van Landschoot Jun 11 '12 at 16:49
    
@KristofVanLandschoot you're welcome. –  thecodeparadox Jun 11 '12 at 16:50
    
The comma-syntac you use at the end of line 4 didn't work in my interpreter though. Should I change that to a ";"? –  Kristof Van Landschoot Jun 11 '12 at 16:52
    
@KristofVanLandschoot yup, I update my answer –  thecodeparadox Jun 11 '12 at 16:56
    
This method does slow down your overall execution time since the HTTP requests are made serially (rather than in parallel). Here's a way to fix that. –  josh3736 Jun 11 '12 at 17:26

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