Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This is the actual code, not the complete code, but the main part of it. Basically here I am writing a plug-in which implements some interface, and I need to store the state of the plugin because it runs multiple times during the whole process. But that storing of state through xml is generating an error

using System;
share|improve this question
    
What is the content of the xml file? –  Jake1164 Jun 11 '12 at 17:38
add comment

3 Answers

Your code won't compile. Use the state instance you have created instead of attempting to set non-static fields. Also make sure you properly dispose IDisposable resources by wrapping them in using statement:

using System.IO;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

namespace Plugin
{
    public class state
    {
        public int a;
        public int b;
    }
    public class xyz
    {
        public static void Main()
        {
            state s = new state();
            s.a = 3;
            s.b = 5;
            XmlSerializer x = new XmlSerializer(s.GetType());
            using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(@"E:\state\state.xml"))
            {
                x.Serialize(sw, s);
            }
        }
    }
}

generates the following XML file:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<state xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" xmlns:xsd="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
  <a>3</a>
  <b>5</b>
</state>
share|improve this answer
    
OOPS! my bad. I corrected my code and even after wrapping it in using statement as you suggested, the same error remains: "There was an error generating the xml document" –  Kaushal Jun 11 '12 at 17:50
    
Hmm, no, I have tested this code and it works perfectly fine. I will update to post a full snippet. Make sure that the process you are running this code under has write permission to the E:\state folder. –  Darin Dimitrov Jun 11 '12 at 17:51
    
the file is getting generated, but it doesn't write anything to it. –  Kaushal Jun 11 '12 at 17:54
    
Did you look at my updated code? Did you run it? –  Darin Dimitrov Jun 11 '12 at 17:54
    
See, my code is a part of a project, your code works perfectly fine if I run it independently, but if I write the same code in my actual project it gives error! Tell me how can I show you my original code? –  Kaushal Jun 11 '12 at 17:57
show 6 more comments

Its also not a good idea to serialize fields, you should use properties

public class state
{
    public int A { get; set; }
    public int B { get; set; }
}

state s = new state() { A = 3, B = 6 };

XmlSerializer x = new XmlSerializer(s.GetType());
using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(@"E:\state\state.xml"))
{
   x.Serialize(sw, s);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Its also not a good idea to serialize fields Why? –  L.B Jun 11 '12 at 17:49
    
Because you have better control and can do things like validation etc. –  Asif Jun 11 '12 at 17:52
    
And what does it solve in the context of this question? –  L.B Jun 11 '12 at 21:53
add comment

Your code won't compile because you are using the name of the class (state) instead of the variable (s).

The following code works and uses using to ensure the stream will close even if an exception occurs:

        var s = new state {a = 3, b = 5};

        var x = new XmlSerializer(typeof(state));
        using(var sw = new StreamWriter(@"E:\state\state.xml"))
            x.Serialize(sw, s);
share|improve this answer
    
Why do you always repeat same answers like stackoverflow.com/a/10984736/932418 –  L.B Jun 11 '12 at 17:45
1  
Coincidence maybe, but it happens sometimes: he starts writing his answer after you start writing yours. You post, he's still editing (and doesn't reload the new answers), and then finally post. boom duplicate answer. StackOverflow is not a thread safe posting environment ;) –  LeSnip3R Jun 11 '12 at 17:48
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.