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i have a class that (right now) is static:

public static class Grob
{
    public static void Frob()
    {
        Foo.Bar();
    }
}

And that works well. Code calls:

Grob.Frob();

and all is right with the world. Now i want my class to implement an interface:

public static class Grob : IOldNewGrob
{
    public static void Frob()
    {
       Foo.Bar();
    }
}

Unfortunately that does not work, because reasons.

So i would try changing to class to a singleton:

public sealed class Grob
{
   private static volatile Singleton instance;
   private static object syncRoot = new Object();

   private Grob() {}

   public static Singleton Instance
   {
      get 
      { 
         if (instance == null) 
         {
            lock (syncRoot) 
            {
               if (instance == null) 
                  instance = new Singleton();
            }
         }
         return instance;
     }
   }       
}

Which works well enough, except that it doesn't work - the code no longer compiles:

Grob.Frob();

In other languages it would not be a problem. i would create a global Grob function (called Grob because that's the name that existing code needs):

function Grob(): GrobSingleton;
{
   return Grob.Instance;
}

//and rename Grob class to something else
public sealed class GrobSinglton
{
   ...
}

except that C# doesn't have global functions.

In the end:

  • i don't need a global function
  • i don't need a static class to be able to implement an interface
  • i don't need a singleton

i just want it all to work.

share|improve this question
1  
Why can't you call Grob.Instance.Frob()? That's how singletons work. –  cdhowie Jun 11 '12 at 17:43
    
@cdhowie i can call Grob.Instance.Frob(); but existing code doesn't. –  Ian Boyd Jun 11 '12 at 17:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Why not just create a singleton which also has a static Frob method?

public sealed class Grob : IOldNewGrob
{
    private static readonly Grob instance = new Grob();

    public static Grob Instance { get { return instance; } }

    // Prevent external instantiation
    private Grob() {}

    public static void Frob()
    {
        Foo.Bar();
    }

    // Implement IOldNewGrob here
}

You should probably also read my article on implementing the singleton pattern in .NET - there's really no need to implement the fragile double-checked locking pattern.

That satisfies both of your requirements of making Grob.Frob() work, and making Grob implement an interface. It's not clear whether those are your only requirements though - you haven't really explained why you're trying to do that - where the singleton or the interface come in.

EDIT: If the idea was that Frob was a member of IOldNewGrob, you can use explicit interface implementation like this:

public sealed class Grob : IOldNewGrob
{
    private static readonly Grob instance = new Grob();

    public static Grob Instance { get { return instance; } }

    // Prevent external instantiation
    private Grob() {}

    public static void Frob()
    {
        // Implementation
    }

    // Explicit interface implementation to prevent name collisions
    void IOldNewGrob.Frob()
    {
        // Call the static implementation
        Frob();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Delegate implementation of my methods to....myself! Nice. Edit: Why not do that? Cause i didn't think of it. The singleton doesn't come in anywhere; it wasn't one before 25 minutes ago. The interface comes in when people take an IOldNewGrob rather than a Grob. –  Ian Boyd Jun 11 '12 at 17:55
    
Oh, wait. i can't have public static void Frob() and public void Frob(). Lemme check Jon's answer Oh, you created a new Foo class. Perhaps using interfaces is overrated. –  Ian Boyd Jun 11 '12 at 18:05
    
@IanBoyd There are various libraries that will take a static class and an interface and generate a proxy class at runtime, delegating the interface method implementations to the corresponding static method. Whether the overhead of an extra dependency and one-time runtime code generation is worth it is a call you'll have to make. It will probably result in simpler code. –  cdhowie Jun 11 '12 at 18:13
    
@IanBoyd: I didn't create a new Foo class. I copied your implementation from the first piece of code in the question. It wasn't clear what you were trying to do, and you never explained that Frob was part of the interface. (This is where a complete example really helps.) You can use explicit interface implementation for this. Will edit... –  Jon Skeet Jun 11 '12 at 19:16

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