Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been playing around with D, trying to mimic Scala style curryable functions by chaining lambda expressions.

I came up with this:

immutable foo=function(immutable int x)=>(immutable int y)=>(x+y);
struct S
{
    static immutable foo=function(immutable int x)=>(immutable int y)=>(x+y);
}
class C     static immutable foo=function(immutable int x)=>(immutable int y)=>(x+y);
}

void main()
{
    writefln("global\t%s",foo(1)(2));
    writefln("struct\t%s",S.foo(1)(2));
    writefln("class\t%s",C.foo(1)(2));
}

This is what I get when I run it:

global  3
struct  1528543170
Segmentation fault

As you can see, my method works well for the global function variable, but the struct's static function variable gives junk result, and the class's static function variable fails completely. If I remove the x from the return expression - function(immutable int x)=>(immutable int y)=>(y) - the struct version gives the correct result(2), but the class version still fails.

If I use a regular method, instead of a function variable:

immutable foo=function(immutable int x)=>(immutable int y)=>(x+y);
struct S
{
    static auto foo(immutable int x)
    {
        return (immutable int y)=>(x+y);
    }
}
class C
{
    static auto foo(immutable int x)
    {
        return (immutable int y)=>(x+y);
    }
}

void main()
{
    writefln("global\t%s",foo(1)(2));
    writefln("struct\t%s",S.foo(1)(2));
    writefln("class\t%s",C.foo(1)(2));
}

it works just fine:

global  3
struct  3
class   3

And I also get the advantage of using delegates(the compiler won't allow delegates in the first version) - but this style is less elegant.

I am well aware that D has the curry function in the std.functional library for currying functions, but sometimes it's more comfortable to make a function curryable by default, and beside - I'm curious to know why my first version doesn't work.

Any ideas?

UPDATE

OK, I've filed a bug. I've done some more digging, and it turns out the argument list of foo gets shifted, and that's why x gets junk data.

share|improve this question
    
WHOA you can say function and say => at the same time?! Didn't know that! :) –  Mehrdad Jun 11 '12 at 18:36
    
By the way, did you try saying static __gshared instead of static by any chance? Maybe it'll work (fingers crossed... I don't have a compiler handy) –  Mehrdad Jun 11 '12 at 18:38
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Honestly, it looks like you ran into a compiler bug. Please report it. Since the variables in the struct and class are static, their behavior should be identical to that of the module-level variable, and clearly, it's not.

share|improve this answer
    
It really is a compiler bug. I narrowed it down some more and reported it. –  Idan Arye Jun 11 '12 at 21:33
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.