Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a report where I capture patient information, some of which is stored in the patient table and some of which is stored in the observations table. Taking date of birth as my example, if I count all the records for which the DOB has been supplied, I get significantly more than the total number of patients, because of the join to the observations table. How do I evaluate the running total only once for each group?

Edit: some sample data over at http://sqlfiddle.com/#!3/27b91/1/0. If I count birthdates from that query, I want 2 as the answer; same for race and ethnicity.

share|improve this question
1  
Do you mean RunningValue? What aggregate are you using? CountDistinct? Some sample code and mock-data from your tables would be helpful in answering this question... – Jeroen Jun 11 '12 at 18:34

The following may or may not be the right approach for your specific situation, but it can be a useful technique to have at your disposal.

You can add some code to your select statement to help yourself answer questions like these 'downstream' (either via added criteria or via SSRS). See this modification of your SQL Fiddle:

select pid, firstName, lastName, dateOfBirth, obsName, obsValue, obsDate, 
      rowRank, CASE rowRank WHEN 1 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS countableRow
from 
(
select Person.pid, Person.firstName, Person.lastName, Person.dateOfBirth
      , Obs.obsName, Obs.obsValue, Obs.obsDate,
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Person.pid, Person.firstName, Person.lastName, Person.dateOfBirth ORDER BY Obs.obsDate) AS rowRank
  from Person
    join Obs on Person.pId = Obs.pId
) rankedData

The rowRank field will create a group-relative ranking number, which may or may not be useful to you downstream. The countableRow field will be either 1 or 0 such that each group will have one and only one row with a 1 in it. Doing SUM(countableRow) will give you the proper number of groups in your data.

Now, you can extend this functionality (if you wish) by dumping out actual field values instead of a constant scalar like 1 in the first row of each group. So, if you had CASE rowRank WHEN 1 THEN dateOfBirth ELSE NULL END AS countableDOB, you could then, for example, get the total number of people with each distinct birthday using just this dataset.

Of course, you can do all those things using methods like @Russell's with SQL anyway, so this would be most relevant with specific downstream requirements that may not match your situation.

EDIT

Obviously the countableRow field there isn't a one-size-fits-all solution to the types of queries you want. I have added a few more examples of the PARTITION BY strategy to another SQL Fiddle:

select pid, firstName, lastName, dateOfBirth, obsName, obsValue, obsDate, 
      rowRank, CASE rowRank WHEN 1 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS countableRow,
      valueRank, CASE valueRank WHEN 1 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS valueCount,
      dobRank, CASE WHEN dobRank = 1 AND dateOfBirth IS NOT NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS dobCount
from 
(
select Person.pid, Person.firstName, Person.lastName, Person.dateOfBirth
      , Obs.obsName, Obs.obsValue, Obs.obsDate,
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Person.pid, Person.firstName, Person.lastName, Person.dateOfBirth ORDER BY Obs.obsDate) AS rowRank,
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Obs.obsName, Obs.obsValue ORDER BY Obs.obsDate) AS valueRank,
      ROW_Number() OVER (PARTITION BY Person.dateOfBirth ORDER BY Person.pid) AS dobRank
  from Person
    join Obs on Person.pId = Obs.pId
) rankedData

Lest anyone misunderstand me as suggesting this is always appropriate, it obviously isn't. This isn't a better solution to getting specific answers using additional SQL queries. What it allows you to do is encode enough information to simply answer such questions in the consuming code all in a single result set. That's where it can come in handy.

SECOND EDIT

Since you were wondering whether you can do this if race data is stored in more than one place, the answer is, absolutely. I have revised the code from my previous SQL Fiddle, which is now available in a new one:

select pid, firstName, lastName, dateOfBirth, obsName, obsValue, obsDate, 
      rowRank, CASE rowRank WHEN 1 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS countableRow,
      valueRank, CASE valueRank WHEN 1 THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS valueCount,
      dobRank, CASE WHEN dobRank = 1 AND dateOfBirth IS NOT NULL THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS dobCount,
      raceRank, CASE WHEN raceRank = 1 AND (race IS NOT NULL OR obsName = 'RACE') THEN 1 ELSE 0 END AS raceCount
from 
(
select Person.pid, Person.firstName, Person.lastName, Person.dateOfBirth, Person.[race]
      , Obs.obsName, Obs.obsValue, Obs.obsDate,
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Person.pid, Person.firstName, Person.lastName, Person.dateOfBirth ORDER BY Obs.obsDate) AS rowRank,
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Obs.obsName, Obs.obsValue ORDER BY Obs.obsDate) AS valueRank,
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Person.dateOfBirth ORDER BY Person.pid) AS dobRank,
      ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY ISNULL(Person.race, CASE Obs.obsName WHEN 'RACE' THEN Obs.obsValue ELSE NULL END) ORDER BY Person.pid) AS raceRank
  from Person
    left join Obs on Person.pId = Obs.pId
) rankedData

As you can see, in the new Fiddle, this properly counts the number of Races as 3, with 2 being in the Obs table and the third being in the Person table. The trick is that PARTITION BY can contain expressions, not just raw column output. Note that I changed the join to a left join here, and that we need to use a CASE to only include obsValue WHERE obsName is 'RACE'. It is a little complicated, but not overwhelmingly so, and it handles even fairly complex cases gracefully.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think I can use this for all my answers, but it definitely covers some of them -- thanks! I suspect it will fall down on the ones where I have to say "if race is supplied in the Person table, then true, else if race is supplied in the Obs table, then true, else false". – SarekOfVulcan Jun 12 '12 at 13:04
1  
@SarekOfVulcan, I don't think there's any reason it should fail there, with a little additional manipulation. I believe this method should allow you to isolate any data you need to isolate, even if it is spread across more than one table, and mark it in the result set as needed. (Do you have Race in your Person table, too? I didn't see it there...) – Dominic P Jun 12 '12 at 13:38
    
I'll investigate. :-) And yes, I have Race in there -- while capturing everything in one location would be ideal, there are historical reasons for multiple locations (such as, earlier versions not quite caught up with OMB's ideas on Race and Ethnicity....) – SarekOfVulcan Jun 12 '12 at 14:31
1  
I have just revised this answer to handle this situation. I did it only for Race, not Ethnicity, but this should demonstrate that even in the case you're discussing it's feasible to use this strategy. – Dominic P Jun 12 '12 at 15:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

It turned out that Jeroen's pointer to RunningValue was more on-target than I thought. I was able to get the results I wanted with the following code:

=RunningValue(Iif(Not IsNothing(Fields!DATEOFBIRTH.Value)
        , Fields!PATIENTID.Value
        , Nothing)
    , CountDistinct
    , Nothing
    )

Thanks particularly to Dominic P, whose technique I'll keep in mind for next time.

share|improve this answer

This will only pull one record per patient, unless they reported different DOBs:

SELECT P.FOO, 
    P.BAR, 
    (etc.), 
    O.DOB
FROM Patients P
INNER JOIN Observations O
    ON P.PatientID = O.PatientID
GROUP BY P.FOO, P.BAR, (P.etc), O.DOB
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.