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Let's say I have an extremely long string with arguments that I want to create. I know you can create a multiline string with

cmd = """line 1
      line 2
      line 3"""

But now lets say I want to pass 1, 2, and 3 as arguments.

This works

cmd = """line %d
      line %d
      line %d""" % (1, 2, 3)

But if I have a super long string with 30+ arguments, how can I possibly pass those arguments in multiple lines? Passing them in a single line defeats the purpose of even trying to create a multiline string.

Thanks to anyone in advance for their help and insight.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could abuse the line continuation properties of the parenthesis ( and the comma ,.

cmd = """line %d
      line %d
      line %d""" % (
      1,
      2,
      3)
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Thanks so much. Exactly what I was looking for. Never knew I could have multiple lines when using brackets. This is of great help!!! –  Quillion Jun 11 '12 at 20:38

You could use the str.format() function, that allows named arguments. So,

'''line {0}
line {1}
line {2}'''.format(1,2,3)

You could of course extend this using Python's *args syntax to allow you to pass in a tuple or list.

args = (1,2,3)
'''line {0}
line {1}
line {2}'''.format(*args)

If you can intelligently name your arguments, the most robust solution (though the most typing-intensive one) would be to use Python's **kwargs syntax to pass in a dictionary.

args = {'arg1':1, 'arg2':2, 'arg3':3}
'''line {arg1}
line {arg2}
line {arg3}'''.format(**args)

For more information on the str.format() mini-language, go here: http://docs.python.org/library/string.html#format-string-syntax

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+1 The **kwargs format is great for readability for many scenarios (though perhaps not the OP's example). –  Darthfett Jun 11 '12 at 19:36

To have the arguments in the same line they are inserted, you could do it like this:

cmd = "line %d\n"%1 +\
      "line %d\n"%2 +\
      "line %d\n"%3

[EDIT:] In reply to the first comment I came up with this:

cmd = "\n".join([
      "line %d"%1,
      "line %d"%2,
      "line %d"%3])
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Doing that with 30+ arguments would not be very efficient. "".join() on a list, on the other hand... :) –  Frédéric Hamidi Jun 11 '12 at 18:40

This works for me:

cmd = """line %d
      line %d
      line %d""" % (
          1,
          2,
          3
      )
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