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Given the two sample tables here:

Tickets Table

ID  User    Description

0   James   This is a support ticket
1   Fred    This is a ticket too

Properties Table

ID  TicketID    Label           Value

0   0           Engineer        Scott
1   1           Engineer        Dale
2   0           Manu            Dell
3   1           Manu            HP
4   0           OS              Windows
5   1           OS              Linux

How can I arrive at a view like this:

ID  User    Description                 Engineer    Manu    OS

1   James   This is a support ticket    Scott       Dell    Windows
2   Fred    This is a ticket too        Dale        HP      Linux

It is important to note that the properties table would not always be the same. Some "Tickets" may have properties that others do not.

Is this even possible?

share|improve this question
1  
Property tables are the devil. –  Jeremy Holovacs Jun 11 '12 at 19:10
    
@Jeremy so can hard-coding property names as column names. Both have their place. –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 11 '12 at 19:12
    
@AaronBertrand, once again I don't disagree with you... but every time I have to use property tables I almost always have performance issues, and they are usually a pain in the butt to pivot. –  Jeremy Holovacs Jun 11 '12 at 19:15
1  
@Jeremy but that does not necessarily represent every time for everyone - I've used EAV with great success in the past, I even blogged about it because so many people have this blanket opinion that it's such a terrible thing. sqlblog.com/blogs/aaron_bertrand/archive/2009/11/19/… It's like cursors. Are they bad in general? Yes. Are they always bad? Absolutely not. –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 11 '12 at 19:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can perform this with a PIVOT. When doing the PIVOT you can do it one of two ways, with a Static Pivot that you will code the rows to transform or a Dynamic Pivot which will create the list of columns at run-time:

Static Pivot (See SQL Fiddle for Demo):

select id, [user], [engineer], [manu], [OS]
from 
(
    select t.id
        , t.[user]
        , p.ticketid
        , p.label
        , p.value
    from tickets t
    inner join properties p
        on t.id = p.ticketid
) x
pivot
(
    min(value)
    for label in ([engineer], [manu], [OS])
) p

Or you can use a Dynamic Pivot (See SQL Fiddle for Demo):

DECLARE @cols AS NVARCHAR(MAX),
    @query  AS NVARCHAR(MAX);

select @cols = STUFF((SELECT distinct ',' + QUOTENAME(p.label) 
                    from tickets t
                    inner join properties p
                        on t.id = p.ticketid
            FOR XML PATH(''), TYPE
            ).value('.', 'NVARCHAR(MAX)') 
        ,1,1,'')

set @query = 'SELECT id, [user], ' + @cols + ' from 
             (
                 select t.id
                        , t.[user]
                        , p.ticketid
                        , p.label
                        , p.value
                    from tickets t
                    inner join properties p
                        on t.id = p.ticketid
            ) x
            pivot 
            (
                min(value)
                for label in (' + @cols + ')
            ) p '

execute(@query)

Both query will return the same results.

share|improve this answer
    
your first example is considerably more complicated than mine with the exact same results, and the second one... dynamic sql? Before going that route, I think you'd want to make darn sure that's a requirement and how the table is going to be consumed. –  Jeremy Holovacs Jun 11 '12 at 19:38
    
You are my new hero. I want to have your babies. (Dynamic Pivot works EXACTLY how I need) –  Scott Beeson Jun 11 '12 at 19:39
1  
@JeremyHolovacs I disagree that the first is more complicated than your version with 3 left joins. As far as the dynamic version, the OP requested a dynamic version of a query which would be flexible and that is what I provided. There are always other ways to answer a question, feel free to suggest another dynamic way. :) –  bluefeet Jun 11 '12 at 19:47
    
This is very slick. We'd love to have you post on DBA.SE. (As a side note, you can remove the TYPE and .value() from the XML query. The call to .value() is unnecessary without the TYPE.) –  Nick Chammas Jun 11 '12 at 19:57
    
@NickChammas thanks for the tip, I will look at DBE.SE –  bluefeet Jun 11 '12 at 19:59

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