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I have a table that looks like this:

CREATE TABLE foobar (
                     id                     SERIAL PRIMARY KEY,
                     data_entry_date        DATE NOT NULL,
                     user_id                INTEGER NOT NULL,
                     wine_glasses_drunk     INTEGER NOT NULL,
                     whisky_shots_drunk     INTEGER NOT NULL,
                     beer_bottle_drunk      INTEGER NOT NULL
                 );

insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-01', 1, 1,0,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-02', 1, 4,0,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-03', 1, 0,0,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-04', 1, 1,0,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-05', 1, 2,1,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-07', 1, 1,2,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-08', 1, 4,0,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-11', 1, 1,1,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-12', 1, 1,0,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-13', 1, 2,0,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-14', 1, 1,0,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-15', 1, 9,3,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-16', 1, 0,4,2);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-17', 1, 0,5,3);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-18', 1, 2,2,5);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-20', 1, 1,1,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-23', 1, 1,3,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-01-24', 1, 0,0,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-02-01', 1, 1,1,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-02-02', 1, 2,3,4);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-02-05', 1, 1,2,2);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-02-09', 1, 0,0,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-02-10', 1, 1,1,1);
insert into foobar (data_entry_date, user_id, wine_glasses_drunk, whisky_shots_drunk, beer_bottle_drunk) VALUES ('2011-02-11', 1, 3,6,3);

I want to write a query that shows me the difference in TOTAL wine_glasses_drunk, TOTAL whisky_shots_drunk and TOTAL beer_bottles_drunk over a given period, compared to the TOTALs for the previous period.

It probably sounds more complicated than it is. If we are using a period* of 1 week == 7 days, then the query should return the difference in the totals consumed for this week, as compared to the totals consumed last week.

A slight complication is that the dates in the table are not continuous - i.e. there are some missing dates, so the query needs to find the most relevant date when determining dates for period calculations.

This is what I have so far:

-- using hard coded dates

SELECT (SUM(f1.wine_glasses_drunk) - SUM(f2.wine_glasses_drunk)) as wine_diff, 
(SUM(f1.whisky_shots_drunk) - SUM(f2.whisky_shots_drunk)) as whisky_diff, 
(SUM(f1.beer_bottle_drunk) - SUM(f2.beer_bottle_drunk)) as beer_diff 
FROM foobar f1 INNER JOIN foobar f2 ON f2.user_id=f1.user_id
WHERE f1.user_id=1 
AND f1.data_entry_date BETWEEN '2011-01-08' AND '2011-01-15'
AND f2.data_entry_date BETWEEN '2011-01-01' AND '2011-01-08'
AND f1.data_entry_date - f2.data_entry_date between 6 and 9;

The above SQL is clearly a hack (especially the f1.data_entry_date - f2.data_entry_date between 6 and 9 criteria). I checked the results in excel, and the results from the query above were (unsuprisingly) wrong.

How can I write this query - and how can I modify it so that it can deal with the non contiguous dates in the database?

I am using postgreSQl, but would prefer if possible, database agnostic (i.e. ANSI) SQL.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I was going to add this as an edit to my other answer, but it really is a different way of doing it so should be a separate answer.

I think I prefer the other answer that I have given but this one should work even if there are gaps in the data.

To set the parameters for the query, change the values of period_start_date and period_days in the query_params part of the with clause.

with query_params as (
  select 
    date '2011-01-01' as period_start_date,
    7 as period_days
),
summary_data as (
select
  user_id,
  (data_entry_date - period_start_date)/period_days as period_number,
  sum(wine_glasses_drunk) as wine_glasses_drunk,
  sum(whisky_shots_drunk) as whisky_shots_drunk,
  sum(beer_bottle_drunk) as beer_bottle_drunk
from foobar
  cross join query_params
group by user_id,
  (data_entry_date - period_start_date)/period_days
)
select
  user_id,
  period_number,
  period_start_date + period_number * period_days as period_start_date,
  sum(wine_glasses_drunk) as wine_glasses_drunk,
  sum(whisky_shots_drunk) as whisky_shots_drunk,
  sum(beer_bottle_drunk) as beer_bottle_drunk
from (
  -- this weeks data
  select 
    user_id,
    period_number,
    wine_glasses_drunk,
    whisky_shots_drunk,
    beer_bottle_drunk
  from summary_data
  union all
  -- last weeks data
  select 
    user_id,
    period_number + 1 as period_number,
    -wine_glasses_drunk as wine_glasses_drunk,
    -whisky_shots_drunk as whisky_shots_drunk,
    -beer_bottle_drunk as beer_bottle_drunk
  from summary_data
) a
cross join query_params
where period_number <= (select max(period_number) from summary_data)
group by 
  user_id,
  period_number,
  period_start_date + period_number * period_days
order by 1, 2

And again, a SQL Fiddle is available.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the updated code. I have run it, but the numbers are different from what is expected. For example, using a start date of '2011-01-01', eyeballing the beer_bottle_druk field in the table, I expect the beer_bottle_drunk column in the query result to be (1+1+1+1+1+1+1) - (1+1+1+1+1+1+2) = -1, but the query result for 2011-01-01 is 7. Am I missing something?. Could you please clarify the meaning of the query result - what is it calculating/showing (I may be able to use it as is). –  Homunculus Reticulli Jun 14 '12 at 23:09
    
The date shown is the start day of the week and is coma red with the previous week. So, the row showing 2011-01-01 is comparing the week 2011-01-01 - 2011-01-07 with the week 2010-12-25 - 2010-12-31. The row with the results that you have asked about is shown as 2011-01-08, since this is the total for the week starting 2011-01-08 minus the total for the week starting 2011-01-01. Make sense? The first row in the results refers to the first week in your source table, but there is no prior week to compare with so it is subtracting 0. –  Mike Meyers Jun 14 '12 at 23:30
    
Hi, Thanks for the feedback. I understand what the query results mean now. Its not quite what I had intended (date shown is the start day of the week - may not be in table). My main concern however is that when I change the start_date from 2011-01-01 to 2011-01-8 (as an example, but you can use any two dates returned in the report), the query results change completely even though the query result dates remain the same - that seems to suggest that something is wrong, since only the period numbers should change if dates occuring in the query results are used as the start_date. Please clarify? –  Homunculus Reticulli Jun 15 '12 at 8:02
    
I noticed that problem last night. Seems to be an issue with integer division. I'm dividing the number of days by the length of the period. The problem is that the result is truncated because it is doing integer division, so 1/7 and -1/7 both get truncated to 0. A new SQL Fiddle is here which fixes the problem but the code is starting to get a bit messy: sqlfiddle.com/#!1/2aee7/123 I think I've gone as far as I can with this. –  Mike Meyers Jun 15 '12 at 15:37
    
Thanks Mike. I will try the code later on today. One quick question - does it still work for other periods other than 7?. For example if I want to look at changes in monthly totals (can I just use 30 instead of 7)?. If yes, I'll accept the answer - and award you a bounty - to show my gratitude and appreciation of your effort. –  Homunculus Reticulli Jun 15 '12 at 15:50

I'm not entirely sure from the description you have given whether I am going about this the right way but I would use two different functions to get you the result you want.

Firstly, look at the date_trunc function. This can get the date of the first day of the week and you can group on that to get the sum for the week. If the first day of the week isn't what you want, you can use date arithmetic to sort that out. I think this first day of the week is Monday.

Secondly, you can use the lag window function to find the sum for the previous row. Note that if you are missing a week, this function will look at the previous row rather than just the previous week. I've put a check in the query just to make sure that the database is looking at the right row.

select 
  user_id,
  week_start_date,
  this_week_wine_glasses_drunk -
    case when is_consecutive_weeks = 'TRUE' 
      then last_week_wine_glasses_drunk else 0 end as wine_glasses_drunk,
  this_week_whisky_shots_drunk -
    case when is_consecutive_weeks = 'TRUE' 
      then last_week_whisky_shots_drunk else 0 end as whisky_shots_drunk,
  this_week_beer_bottle_drunk -
    case when is_consecutive_weeks = 'TRUE' 
      then last_week_beer_bottle_drunk else 0 end as beer_bottle_drunk
from (
select
  user_id,
  week_start_date,
  this_week_wine_glasses_drunk,
  this_week_whisky_shots_drunk,
  this_week_beer_bottle_drunk,
  case when (lag(week_start_date)
    over (partition by user_id order by week_start_date)  + interval '7' day)
      = week_start_date then 'TRUE' end as is_consecutive_weeks,
  lag(this_week_wine_glasses_drunk) 
    over (partition by user_id order by week_start_date) as last_week_wine_glasses_drunk,
  lag(this_week_whisky_shots_drunk) 
    over (partition by user_id order by week_start_date) as last_week_whisky_shots_drunk,
  lag(this_week_beer_bottle_drunk) 
    over (partition by user_id order by week_start_date) as last_week_beer_bottle_drunk
from (
  select
    user_id,
    date_trunc('week', data_entry_date) as week_start_date,
    sum(wine_glasses_drunk) as this_week_wine_glasses_drunk,
    sum(whisky_shots_drunk) as this_week_whisky_shots_drunk,
    sum(beer_bottle_drunk) as this_week_beer_bottle_drunk
  from foobar
  group by user_id,
    date_trunc('week', data_entry_date)
  ) a
) b

A SQL fiddle is available for you to look at.

By the way, I'm from an Oracle background and have hacked this up using the PostgreSQL documentation and SQL Fiddle. Hopefully it's what you need.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for 'data driven code' that selects the start and end dates from the available data. Lots of code there, it'll take me a little while to understand all of it and ensure that its doing what I want to do. –  Homunculus Reticulli Jun 14 '12 at 17:55
    
Just been for a run and realised there is a problem with this solution if there is a missing week in the data. I'll post an edit in an hour or so. –  Mike Meyers Jun 14 '12 at 18:22
    
This is looking good so far (notwithstanding the potential bug you spotted). Whilst you are it though, now may be the time to point out that I was thinking of being able to run the query in an adhoc manner so I could run queries like give me the weekly change in beer, whisky, wine AS OF A SPECIFIED DATE. Here weekly is the parameter passed to the query (it could just as easily been 14 [fortnightly change], 30 [monthly change] etc). The AS OF A SPECIFIED DATE part simply means that I can go back in time to a date and see what the change were AT that date. –  Homunculus Reticulli Jun 14 '12 at 18:47
    
Hmmm. Argh! Sounds hard. I'll think about it. I did notice in the original question that you had a little asterisk after "period" and I wondered why. Now I know. There must be a way to solve it. I'll see what I can do. –  Mike Meyers Jun 14 '12 at 18:50
    
Mike: Hehe, yeah I am strugling with it too! :) I tell you what, if you are able to come up with a solution, I'll give you a (well deserved) bonus :) –  Homunculus Reticulli Jun 14 '12 at 18:59

A slightly different approach (I'll let you fill in the date parameters.):

Declare @StartDate1, @EndDate1, @StartDate2, @EndDate2 AS Date
Set @StartDate1='6/1/2012'
Set @EndDate1='6/15/2012'
Set @StartDate2='6/16/2012'
Set @EndDate2='6/30/2012'

SELECT SUM(U.WineP1)-SUM(U.WineP2) AS WineDiff, SUM(U.WhiskeyP1)-SUM(U.WhiskeyP2) AS WhiskeyDiff, SUM(U.BeerP1)-SUM(U.BeerP2) AS BeerDiff
FROM
(
SELECT SUM(wine_glasses_drunk) AS WineP1, SUM(whisky_shots_drunk) AS WhiskeyP1, SUM(beer_bottle_drunk) AS BeerP1, 0 AS WineP2, 0 AS WhiskeyP2, 0 AS BeerP2
FROM foobar
WHERE data_entry_date BETWEEN @StartDate1 AND @EndDate1

UNION ALL

SELECT 0 AS WineP1, 0 AS WhiskeyP1, 0 AS BeerP1, SUM(wine_glasses_drunk) AS WineP2, SUM(whisky_shots_drunk) AS WhiskeyP2, SUM(beer_bottle_drunk) AS BeerP2
FROM foobar
WHERE data_entry_date BETWEEN @StartDate2 AND @EndDate2
) AS U
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for your answer. I tried it, but the results did not match what I got when using Excel to check the results. See: sqlfiddle.com/#!1/58807/28 –  Homunculus Reticulli Jun 14 '12 at 17:23
    
Your date parameters on sqlfiddle.com are 2001. Table dates are 2011. Also, for the BETWEEN dates, the first date needs to be earlier than the second date. Therefore, in your sqlfiddle example, the last WHERE clause should read WHERE data_entry_date BETWEEN '2011-01-01' AND '2011-01-08' instead of WHERE data_entry_date BETWEEN '2011-01-08' AND '2011-01-01'. Also, remember that the BETWEEN clause is inclusive. Right now, Period 1 and Period 2 both include 1/8. –  Holger Brandt Jun 14 '12 at 17:44
    
My bad, I fixed that now. I'll carefully (i.e. manually) check the results a little later. +1 for code that actually returns something useful! –  Homunculus Reticulli Jun 14 '12 at 17:53

As a general rule when developing these queries, build it in peices and then combine them. find a good structure first, then build all of the peices you need separately so you can understand how each peice works on its own.

Here, I think you will need to use more subqueries to find a clear way of doing it. I think you could try something along these lines:

Calculate the date ranges needed, and hold them as variables. (You may want to add days to the date to find the next period, instead of the code you gave above.)

Declare @SQL1, @SQL2, @SQL3 as Date
Set @SQL1=(SQL1)
...

Next, find the totals per week, in a way that uses the dates as parameters.

Select 
  sum(wine_glasses_drunk) as wine_totals, 
  sum(whiskey_shots_drunk) as whiskey_totals, 
  sum(beer_bottle_drunk) as beer_totals,
  case 
    when data_entry_date between @SQL1 and @SQL2 then 1
    when data_entry_date between @SQL2 and @SQL3 then 2
  end as period_number
from foobar

Then, build the summary query you need around this, since the data is in a format that makes it easy, and you don't need to use so many sums of the same values multiple times.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the snippet. I dont quite understand it though. Could you please explain where the differencing is being done?, also please explain your statement: You may want to add days to the date to find the next period. Cheers –  Homunculus Reticulli Jun 14 '12 at 6:53
    
Sorry. I just created the peice to use in the sub query, and did not write the difference logic. –  David Manheim Jun 14 '12 at 13:09
    
The point about the "You may want to add the days to the dat" is that if you want to have an easy way to find the periods, you can simply add 7 to the earliest day to get the next day. In Postgresql, you want to add an interval data type to a date data type to get a new date, which is that interval later. This way, you don't need the complex code for SQL2 and SQL3, you can simply add to a variable. –  David Manheim Jun 14 '12 at 13:13
    
You may want to check out: wiki.postgresql.org/wiki/… –  David Manheim Jun 14 '12 at 13:13

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