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This has been a pet peeve of mine since I started using .NET but I was curious in case I was missing something. My code snippet won't compile (please forgive the forced nature of the sample) because (according to the compiler) a return statement is missing:

public enum Decision { Yes, No}

    public class Test
    {
        public string GetDecision(Decision decision)
        {
            switch (decision)
            {
                case Decision.Yes:
                    return "Yes, that's my decision";
                case Decision.No:
                    return "No, that's my decision";

            }
        }
    }

Now I know I can simply place a default statement to get rid of the complier warning, but to my mind not only is that redundant code, its dangerous code. If the enumeration was in another file and another developer comes along and adds Maybe to my enumeration it would be handled by my default clause which knows nothing about Maybes and there's a really good chance we're introducing a logic error.

Whereas, if the compiler let me use my code above, it could then identify that we have a problem as my case statement would no longer cover all the values from my enumeration. Sure sounds a lot safer to me.

This is just so fundamentally wrong to me that I want to know if its just something I'm missing, or do we just have to be very careful when we use enumerations in switch statements?

EDIT: I know I can raise exceptions in the default or add a return outside of the switch, but this are still fundamentally hacks to get round a compiler error that shouldn't be an error.

With regards an enum really just being an int, that's one of .NET's dirty little secrets which is quite embarassing really. Let me declare an enumeration with a finite number of possibilities please and give me a compilation for:

Decision fred = (Decision)123;

and then throw an exception if somebody tries something like:

int foo = 123;
Decision fred = (Decision)foo;

EDIT 2:

A few people have made comments about what happens when the enum is in a different assembly and how this would result in problems. My point is that this is the behaviour I think should happen. If I change a method signature this will lead to issues, my premis is that changing an enumeration should be this same. I get the impression that a lot of people don't think I understand about enums in .NET. I do I just think that the behaviour is wrong, and I'd hoped that someone might have known about some very obscure feature that would have altered my opinion about .NET enums.

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7  
I think you mean "public enum Decision { Yes, No, FileNotFound }" –  Juliet Jul 8 '09 at 15:07
1  
nice one Juliet... but you should probably make it clear that it's a joke, I'm not sure this is obvious for everybody ;) –  Thomas Levesque Jul 8 '09 at 15:10
2  
@jasonh working on your basis that enums can change so can methods, does that mean that all classes should have a default method to fall back on in case .NET can't find the method signature you requested? –  Mark Jul 8 '09 at 18:01
1  
@Luke the compiler is telling me that there is a return statement missing because due to the .NET implimentation of an enum it can find a code path that doesn't find have an return value. That is only true because .NET's enums aren't true enumerations. If they were there are only two possible routes through the routine. –  Mark Jul 8 '09 at 18:05
2  
@Mark: This isn't due to the .NET implementation of enum, it's just how the switch statement works: You'll get the same error if you use a bool and cover the true and false paths but omit the default; or if you use a byte and cover all 256 possible paths without a default; or use a short and cover all 65536 paths without a default etc etc. –  LukeH Jul 8 '09 at 22:48

8 Answers 8

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Heck, the situation is far worse than just dealing with enums. We don't even do this for bools!

public class Test {        
  public string GetDecision(bool decision) {
    switch (decision) {
       case true: return "Yes, that's my decision";                
       case false: return "No, that's my decision"; 
    }
  }
}

Produces the same error.

Even if you solved all the problems with enums being able to take on any value, you'd still have this issue. The flow analysis rules of the language simply do not consider switches without defaults to be "exhaustive" of all possible code paths, even when you and I know they are.

I would like very much to fix that, but frankly, we have many higher priorities than fixing this silly little issue, so we've never gotten around to it.

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3  
Thanks Eric for being able to see through my ramblings to the heart of the issue. However, don't you see that in the case of the enumeration is can actually lead to problems, by forcing a redundant default case that me turn into a dangerous one. –  Mark Jul 8 '09 at 18:10
4  
Yep. The fact that enums are nothing more than fancy ints, and the fact that enums can change from version to version, make them dangerous to use. That is unfortunate; the next time you design a type system from scratch, you'll know not to repeat this mistake. –  Eric Lippert Jul 8 '09 at 20:08

That's because the value of decision could actually be a value that is not part of the enumeration, for instance :

string s = GetDecision((Decision)42);

This kind of thing is not prevented by the compiler or the CLR. The value could also be a combination of enum values :

string s = GetDecision(Decision.Yes | Decision.No);

(even if the enum doesn't have the Flags attribute)

Because of that, you should always put a default case in you switch, since you can't check all possible values explicitly

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That is the crux of it! –  ljs Jul 8 '09 at 15:10
    
I appreciate that you can do those things, but to me they're just cases of .NET giving you the rope to hang yourself. –  Mark Jul 8 '09 at 15:24
    
Well, actually that makes sense for enums with the Flags attribute... this attribute means that you can combine the values, which often results in values that are not explicitly part of the enum, but are valid nevertheless. However I would like the compiler to allow this only for Flags enums... –  Thomas Levesque Jul 8 '09 at 16:19
    
Actually, it's giving you enough rope to efficiently interoperate with existing COM and WIN32 apis that define enumerated integral types for their flags. But yes, you have to be careful with that rope. –  Eric Lippert Jul 8 '09 at 16:21

Throw an exception in the default clause:

default:
    throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException("decision");

This ensures that all possible paths are covered, while avoiding the logic errors resulting from adding a new value.

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public enum Decision { Yes, No}

public class Test
{
    public string GetDecision(Decision decision)
    {
        switch (decision)
        {
            case Decision.Yes:
                return "Yes, that's my decision";
            case Decision.No:
                return "No, that's my decision";
            default: throw new Exception(); // raise exception here.

        }
    }
}
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The default is there to protect you. Throw an exception from the default and if anyone adds an extra enum, you're covered with something to flag it.

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I know I can do that but its still introducing a runtime exception that could be avoided. .NET forces you to use breaks rather than allowing fall-throughs to avoid logic errors forcing the use of a default is just asking for trouble. –  Mark Jul 8 '09 at 15:11
    
It can't be caught at compile-time because of what Thomas L said, so the default is there to make sure it is caught. –  Joel Goodwin Jul 8 '09 at 15:19

I realize that this is a thread resurrection...

I personally feel that the way that switch works is correct, and it operates how I would logically want it to.

I'm surprised to hear such complaining about the default label.

If you only have a strict set of enums or values that you are testing, you don't need all of the exception handling lines, or a return outside of the switch, etc.

Just put the default label over one of the other labels, perhaps the label that would be the most common response. In your example case it probably doesn't matter which one. Short, sweet, and it fulfills your needs to rid of the compiler warning:

switch (decision)
{
    default:
    case Decision.Yes:
        return "Yes, that's my decision";
    case Decision.No:
        return "No, that's my decision";
}

If you don't want the default to be Yes, put the default label above the No label.

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I always think of that default as the fall through/exception.

So here it would not be maybe but instead would be "Invalid Decision, contact support".

I don't see how it would fall through to that but that would be the catchall/exception case.

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In addition to the case of, you can cast any int to your enum and have an enum you aren't handling. There is also the case where, if the enum is in an external .dll, and that .dll is updated, it does not break your code if an additional option is added to the enum (like Yes, No, Maybe). So, to handle those future changes you need the default case as well. There is no way to guarantee at compile time that you know every value that enum will have for it's life.

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