Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to run a function (funcA) and use another function (timerFunc) as a timer. If the running function (funcA) has run for 10 seconds, I would like to exit it using the timer function (timerFunc). Is this possible? Basically what I am trying to do:

void funcA() {
    // check event 1
    // check event 2
    // check event 3
    // time reaches max here! --exit--
    //check event 4
}

If not, what is the best way to handle such scenarios? I have considered using a stop-watch but I'm not sure if that is the best thing to do, mainly because I do not know after what event the timeout will be reached.

share|improve this question
1  
Is there a set point in funcA that you would be checking if you are to exit, or do you just want to stop execution no matter where in funcA you are? –  Malcolm O'Hare Jun 11 '12 at 19:46
    
Malcolm, thanks for your response. i would like to exit function no matter where in funcA i am. –  Vicky Jun 11 '12 at 19:47
    
if you want to exit no matter what, then the thread abort solution I posted below will do that, but beware, this can be very dangrous to stability and performance depending on what you are doing in that funtion –  Jason Coyne Jun 11 '12 at 20:03

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could put all of the events into an array of Action or other type of delegate, then loop over the list and exit at the appropriate time.

Alternately, run all of the events in a background thread or Task or some other threading mechanism, and abort/exit the thread when you get to the appropriate time. A hard abort is a bad choice, as it can cause leaks, or deadlocks, but you could check CancellationToken or something else at appropriate times.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you everyone for your answers. i have found the solution using Jason's suggestion above. –  Vicky Jun 16 '12 at 17:29
Thread t = new Thread(LongProcess);
t.Start();
if (t.Join(10 * 1000) == false)
{
    t.Abort();
}
//You are here in at most 10 seconds


void LongProcess()
{
    try
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Start");
        Thread.Sleep(60 * 1000);
        Console.WriteLine("End");
    }
    catch (ThreadAbortException)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Aborted");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I would create a list and then very quickyl:

class Program
{
    static private bool stop = false;
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Timer tim = new Timer(10000);
        tim.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(tim_Elapsed);
        tim.Start();

        int eventIndex = 0;
        foreach(Event ev in EventList)
        {
           //Check ev
            // see if the bool was set to true
            if (stop)
                break;
        }
    }

    static void tim_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        stop = true;
    }
}

This should work for a simple scenario. If it's more complex, we might need more details.

share|improve this answer
1  
I think he actually means functions rather than events, based on his description of FuncA –  Jason Coyne Jun 11 '12 at 20:07
    
Hi Jason, I thought he was checking a list of events in the FuncA. Might need some clarifications. –  MBen Jun 11 '12 at 20:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.