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I want to toggle between two values in Python, that is, between 0 and 1.

For example, when I run a function the first time, it yields the number 0. Next time, it yields 1. Third time it's back to zero, and so on.

Sorry if this doesn't make sense, but does anyone know a way to do this?

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10 Answers 10

up vote 42 down vote accepted

Use itertools.cycle():

from itertools import cycle
myIterator = cycle(range(2))

myIterator.next()   # or next(myIterator) which works in Python 3.x. Yields 0
myIterator.next()   # or next(myIterator) which works in Python 3.x. Yields 1
# etc.

Note that if you need a more complicated cycle than [0, 1], this solution becomes MUCH more attractive than the other ones posted here...

from itertools import cycle
mySmallSquareIterator = cycle(i*i for i in range(10))
# Will yield 0, 1, 4, 9, 16, 25, 36, 49, 64, 81, 0, 1, 4, ...
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2  
Why not simply use itertools.cycle(range(2)) directly? –  DSM Jun 11 '12 at 20:23
    
Because I always forget about range :-) Will edit shortly. –  Platinum Azure Jun 11 '12 at 20:25
5  
No, what I mean is that myIterator = itertools.cycle(range(2)) works by itself. You don't need myFuncGenerator. –  DSM Jun 11 '12 at 20:26
    
...True. I guess I wanted to illustrate some other concepts. Will edit shortly. –  Platinum Azure Jun 11 '12 at 20:26
    
you should demonstrate a larger range, or a 'string', then cycle really starts looking good.. –  fraxel Jun 11 '12 at 20:28

You can accomplish that with a generator like this:

>>> def alternate():
...   while True:
...     yield 0
...     yield 1
...
>>>
>>> alternator = alternate()
>>>
>>> alternator.next()
0
>>> alternator.next()
1
>>> alternator.next()
0
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This is far more generalizable than the other answers (not limited to 2 values, to 0 and 1, to consecutive values...). –  octern Jun 11 '12 at 20:25
    
I like this answer too. –  mgilson Jun 11 '12 at 20:27
4  
-1 use itertools –  Marcin Jun 11 '12 at 20:28
4  
itertools.cycle() works with any iterable of known values. I don't see how either the itertools solution or this one can have its generator switch values at runtime, but I'm sure such a thing is not difficult. –  Platinum Azure Jun 11 '12 at 20:28
    
neat and flexible solution. –  Levon Jun 11 '12 at 20:42

You may find it useful to create a function alias like so:

import itertools
myfunc = itertools.cycle([0,1]).next

then

myfunc()    # -> returns 0
myfunc()    # -> returns 1
myfunc()    # -> returns 0
myfunc()    # -> returns 1
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+1 neat, didn't know I could do this with itertools –  Levon Jun 11 '12 at 20:44
    
+1 for the function alias idea. It's like the generator solution (most popular at time of writing) but without having to write out a function definition! –  Platinum Azure Jun 11 '12 at 21:01

you can use the mod (%) operator.

count = 0  # initialize count once

then

count = (count + 1) % 2

will toggle the value of count between 0 and 1 each time this statement is executed. The advantage of this approach is that you can cycle through a sequence of values (if needed) from 0 - (n-1) where n is the value you use with your % operator. And this technique does not depend on any Python specific features/libraries.

e.g.,

count = 0

for i in range(5):
     count = (count + 1) % 2
     print count

gives:

1
0
1
0
1
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xor is more efficient and functionally the same. –  Alex Chamberlain Jun 11 '12 at 20:23
    
Why not just print i % 2 ? –  Akavall Jun 11 '12 at 21:00
    
@Akavall OP wants to toggle between two values, not necessarily just print two values. –  Levon Jun 11 '12 at 21:08
    
@Levon, OK, I see. Thanks. –  Akavall Jun 11 '12 at 21:10

In python, True and False are integers (1 and 0 respectively). You could use a boolean (True or False) and the not operator:

var = not var

Of course, if you want to iterate between other numbers than 0 and 1, this trick becomes a little more difficult.

To pack this into an admittedly ugly function:

def alternate():
    alternate.x=not alternate.x
    return alternate.x

alternate.x=True  #The first call to alternate will return False (0)

mylist=[5,3]
print(mylist[alternate()])  #5
print(mylist[alternate()])  #3
print(mylist[alternate()])  #5
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4  
Overly complicated... highly suggest looking into itertools. –  Platinum Azure Jun 11 '12 at 20:34
    
@PlatinumAzure : Itertools is a better option. (in fact, I upvoted your solution). The above is only to demonstrate a neat trick which can be useful in some circumstances -- the packing into a function part is not recommended. (functions probably shouldn't save state, that's what classes are for...). But the fact that True and False can be used to index arrays as 0 and 1 is neat (I think) –  mgilson Jun 11 '12 at 20:39
    
If you really want to save state in a function, you can use alternate.x from within it (instead of using the default trick).. which I have to admit I've used once or twice. (But only once or twice.) –  DSM Jun 11 '12 at 20:44
from itertools import cycle

alternator = cycle((0,1))
next(alternator) # yields 0
next(alternator) # yields 1
next(alternator) # yields 0
next(alternator) # yields 1
#... forever
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2  
+1 for the fellow itertools stalwart :-) –  Platinum Azure Jun 11 '12 at 20:38

Using xor works, and is a good visual way to toggle between two values.

count = 1
count = count ^ 1 # count is now 0
count = count ^ 1 # count is now 1
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var = 1
var = 1 - var

That's the official tricky way of doing it ;)

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That will go from 1 to 0 to 0 to 0 to... (-1) –  Platinum Azure Jun 11 '12 at 20:23
    
fixed. thank you –  SetSlapShot Jun 11 '12 at 20:24

Using the tuple subscript trick:

value = (1, 0)[value]
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1  
That's a neat trick, but it seems like using this to alternate among any values other than 0 and 1 would get ugly fast. –  octern Jun 11 '12 at 20:24
2  
True. This trick is mainly used as an alternative to the ternary operator, but happens to work just as well for the OP's specific case. Just thought I'd throw something different into the mix ;) –  Shawn Chin Jun 11 '12 at 20:28

Using tuple subscripts is one good way to toggle between two values:

toggle_val = 1

toggle_val = (1,0)[toggle_val]

If you wrapped a function around this, you would have a nice alternating switch.

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