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as for the definition of Person:

public class Person {
    private int id;
    private int characteristics;
    public boolean equals (Object obj) {
           if (obj == this) {
                 return true;
           }
           if (obj instanceof Person) {
                 if (id == ((Person) obj).id) {
                     return true;
                 } else if (characteristics == ((Person) obj).characteristics) {
                     return true;
                 }
           }
           return false;
    }
}

cause 2 Person objects a and b must have the identical hash code if a.equals(b) returns true, how should I implement the hashCode method?

solution

my equals method implementation is incorrect according to Java's equivalence protocol: transitivity is not satisfied: a.id = 1, a.characteristic = 2, b.id = 1, b.characteristic = 3, c.id = 2, c.characteristic = 3; a.equals(b) == true, b.equals(c) == true, but a.equals(c) == false.

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1  
You can XOR the id and characteristics variables. – Chris Dargis Jun 11 '12 at 20:33
    
For the record, you can convert the second set of those ifs into returns, ie. return obj instanceof Person && ( id == ((Person) obj).id || characteristics == ((Person) obj).characteristics);. You should also take care to return false at the end of your current code, since your equals method may run without returning anything. – SimplyPanda Jun 11 '12 at 20:34
3  
@SimplyPanda That's completely wrong on the first one. return obj == this; will return false if obj is not the same instance, but may still be equal by value. – cdhowie Jun 11 '12 at 20:35
    
Ah, you're right, it's illogical to do so in the first case. My bad. I've fixed it. – SimplyPanda Jun 11 '12 at 20:36
2  
int hashCode(){return 1;} you can't use the object as key – bestsss Jun 11 '12 at 20:53
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Since your class considers objects equal when either of their respective id or characteristics fields are equal, the only hash code you can reasonably use here is a constant value for all instances:

public int hashCode() {
    return 0;
}

This will make hash-based lookups perform horribly.

An either-or test in equals() is generally a bad idea; the objects aren't actually equal, are they? Maybe they are just a "match for each other?" Perhaps you should consider leaving equals() alone and implementing some other comparison method.


As Thomasz pointed out, your equals() test is not transitive; if a.equals(b) && b.equals(c) is true then a.equals(c) must be true. This is not true with your overload, and therefore your implementation breaks the contract of equals(). I would strongly urge you to implement this test in a different method and leave equals() alone.

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2  
this is the right answer :) (equals is good for set/collections, just hashcode doesn't work in the OP's case) – bestsss Jun 11 '12 at 20:57

This is what auto-generated for your class:

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    int result = id;
    result = 31 * result + characteristics;
    return result;
}

And after few refactorings:

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    return 31 * id + characteristics;
}

And for the record, is it just me or is your equals() broken? You consider two objects equal if either ids or characteristics are equal, but not necessarily both of them. This means your equality is not transitive which might have really unexpected side effects once your object goes into wilderness.

Here is a decent implementation:

@Override
public boolean equals(Object o) {
    if (this == o) {
        return true;
    }
    if (!(o instanceof Person)) {
        return false;
    }

    Person person = (Person) o;
    return characteristics == person.characteristics && id == person.id;
}
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1  
This doesn't seem exactly right to me, doesn't the OP's equals() method indicate if (id == person.id) || (characteristics == person.characteristics) – NominSim Jun 11 '12 at 20:44
    
YES: if (id == person.id) || (characteristics == person.characteristics) – xando Jun 11 '12 at 20:48
    
@NominSim: you are right. However the definition of equals() by OP is not transitive, my hashCode() is valid for correct equals() - which I noticed later. I accept your downvote with humility, however I believe OP has bigger issue then... – Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jun 11 '12 at 20:49
    
@Tomasz Nurkiewicz thanks for help. this issue can be addressed as follows in general: if two persons have the same id, they are regarded as the same person; or if two persons with different ids have the same characteristics, they are also regarded as the same person. this is reasonable cases in FOL computing. – xando Jun 11 '12 at 20:53
3  
@Kejia: I don't know what FOL computing is, I am sure you know your domain. What I am saying is that when having three people, A, B and C, A and B are equal because they have the same id but different characteristics. B and C are equal because they have same characteristics but different id. However, A and C are not equal, which might have serious consequences once you start using such object e.g. in collections. – Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jun 11 '12 at 20:56

If having the same id implies always having the same characteristics (which seems necessary for your equals() to be valid), then your hash code can use characteristics alone:

@Override
public int hashCode() {
    return characteristics;
}

If that's not the case, you may want to reconsider using Java equality to express this relation, as @cdhowie suggests.

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