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I always wondered how much I should test my code (with unit tests).

Let's say I have this component:

@Stateless
public class UserManager {
    @PersistenceContext
    EntityManager entityManager;

    @Inject
    Event<UserEvent> event;

    public User getUserByUsername(String username) {
        User user = entityManager
                     .createQuery("SELECT u FROM User u WHERE u.username = :username", User.class)
                     .setParameter("username", username)
                     .getSingleResult();
        event.fire(new UserEvent("some message"));

        return user;
    }
}

To test it really thoroughly, I should mock Event and EntityManager. Which of these should I do then?

  • Verify that method createQuery on entityManager is called exactly once with the given JPQL statement.
  • Verify that method setParameter is called exactly once with the given parameters.
  • Verify that method getSingleResult is called exactly once.
  • Verify that event is fired with the given parameters exactly once.
  • Test that the correct user is returned.

All? It seems to me very invasive since every little change in my implementation results in change needed to be done in my tests.

I have two a little different questions which I think are related.

Q2: On arquillian webiste, you can read this:

Arquillian let's you ditch the mocks and write real tests.

Does it mean I shouldn't use mock objects? How can (with arquillian) I test my code really thoroughly then?

Q3: According to TDD, you should write tests first and then the implementation. But how do you want to do it if you don't have either the implementation or the api, so the tests won't compile?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I always wondered how much I should test my code (with unit tests).

If you have no business logic in your DAL then I'd say: Don't write (pure) unit tests, write integration tests. Write the integration tests tests first.

I say this as you are doing very little, most of the fun stuff happen on the database or in the ORM and that is where the problems will come from.

The only (pure) unit test I might consider is one to show that the event is fired.

I don't know how Arquillian works, and given the small number "world" required I'd likely not use it for this test. Rather I'd just new up a EntityManager in the test method and pass it down. I'd likely mock the Event<UserEvent>.

Does it mean I shouldn't use mock objects?

Mocks (and other fakes) are a tool. They can be very useful. But they do not solve every problem, nor should they be used to test every thing.

According to TDD, you should write tests first and then the implementation. But how do you want to do it if you don't have either the implementation or the api

The tests help you work out the API.

so the tests won't compile?

A failure. Fix the failure and re-run the tests.

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Q3: According to TDD, you should write tests first and then the implementation. But how do you want to do it if you don't have either the implementation or the api, so the tests won't compile?

The tests should compile but fail. You can stub out methods in class definitions so that they appear when writing your tests, but the method bodies should not be implemented yet before running the tests.

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