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I have a project which has some lib's associated with it (in Build Path).

Now, when I export the project in jar, I have mulitple options e.g., eclipse creating a new manifest file (with just one line), create a runnable jar (where it will add the classpath information as well).

My question is, is there a simple way in eclipse where it will add the classpath libraries into the manifest (i dont want to create runnable jar). I know I can edit jar in various ways. If the answer is "no, there is no direct way", my next question is, "Why, this is a very common requirement, is not it" and eclipse does so while creating a runnable jar, then why not for non-runnable jars?

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Why you want to have libraries in manifest and not runnable jar? (only difference is MainClass entrz in the manifest - Am I correct?) –  Hurda Jun 11 '12 at 21:07

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"Why, this is a very common requirement, is not it" and eclipse does so while creating a runnable jar, then why not for non-runnable jars?

Who says it is a common requirement?
A jar file is just a library. Could be self-contained or dependent on other jars.
If you have a dependency for a jar you document it as dependency. You don't distribute jars that include other jars.
E.g. if you include an apache library in your project you also download commons-loggingseparately as a dependency.
It is not included/bundled in the jar.
Otherwise you'll end up with jars the size of 30 MB ....

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Got it! The idea it NOT to add depenent jar files within your jar file. Dependent jar files should be shipped separately. Is that correct? –  Sandeep Jindal Jun 11 '12 at 21:17
    
A jar is a library offering a specific functionality. You should document all its depencencies as part of the README file for the library. When you package your application for delivery, then you package all the prerequisite libraries as well –  Cratylus Jun 11 '12 at 21:20
    
Just confirm, Ideally (or best practice is) we do not package other jar files inside of any jar (or the main jar which contains you 'primary code'). –  Sandeep Jindal Jun 11 '12 at 21:23
    
I can't say what is ideal for your application. You may want to deliver just a single jar with all the depedencies inside and the user can just double click on the jar. –  Cratylus Jun 11 '12 at 21:27

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