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I need help sorting in perl. I have an array of dates in this format. DD-MMM-YY. Example 19-FEB-12.

I have spent quite a lot of time already, but couldn't get it work. I'm very new to perl as well. Any amount of help is appreciated. Thanks!!

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3  
What have you tried, exactly? –  Jack Maney Jun 11 '12 at 21:27

6 Answers 6

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Totally from scratch:

Printed Output:

Unsorted:
14-OCT-06
15-OCT-06
13-OCT-06
19-FEB-12
29-DEC-02
15-JAN-02

Sorted (Least recent to most recent):
15-JAN-02
29-DEC-02
13-OCT-06
14-OCT-06
15-OCT-06
19-FEB-12

Code:

#!C:\Perl64

#Input Strings
@inputs = ('14-OCT-06','15-OCT-06','13-OCT-06', '19-FEB-12', '29-DEC-02', '15-JAN-02');

print "Unsorted:\n";
foreach(@inputs){
    print $_."\n";
}

# Hash for Month : Number
%months = ('JAN' => '01',
         'FEB' => '02',
         'MAR' => '03',
         'APR' => '04',
         'MAY' => '05',
         'JUN' => '06',
         'JUL' => '07',
         'AUG' => '08',
         'SEP' => '09',
         'OCT' => '10',
         'NOV' => '11',
         'DEC' => '12');
# Hash for Number : Month
%revmonths = ('01'=>'JAN',
         '02' => 'FEB',
         '03' => 'MAR',
         '04' => 'APR',
         '05' => 'MAY',
         '06' => 'JUN',
         '07' => 'JUL',
         '08' => 'AUG',
         '09' => 'SEP',
         '10' => 'OCT',
         '11' => 'NOV',
         '12' => 'DEC');

# Rearrange the order to 'Year-Month-Day'
@dates = ();
foreach(@inputs){
    my @split = split('-',$_);
    my @rearranged = reverse(@split);
    @rearranged[1] = $months{$rearranged[1]};
    push(@dates, \@rearranged);
}

# Sort based on these three fields
@sorted = sort { $a->[2] <=> $b->[2] } @dates;
@sorted = sort { $a->[1] <=> $b->[1] } @sorted;
@sorted = sort { $a->[0] <=> $b->[0] } @sorted;

# Replace Month Number with Month name
$size = @sorted;
for $counter (0..$size-1){
    my $ref = $sorted[$counter];
    my @array = @$ref;
    my $num = $array[1];
    $array[1] = $revmonths{$array[1]};
    my @array = reverse(@array);
    $sorted[$counter] = \@array;
}

print "\nSorted (Least recent to most recent):\n";
foreach(@sorted){
    my @temp = @$_;
    my $day = $temp[0];
    my $month = $temp[1];
    my $year = $temp[2];
    print $day."-".$month."-".$year;
    print "\n";
}
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This can be done using the Time::Piece core module's strptime method to decode the dates and sorting them according to the resulting epoch seconds.

This program demonstrates the idea.

use strict;
use warnings;

use Time::Piece;

my @dates = <DATA>;
chomp @dates;

my @sorted = sort {
  Time::Piece->strptime($a, '%d-%b-%y') <=> Time::Piece->strptime($b, '%d-%b-%y')
} @dates;

print "$_\n" for @sorted;

__DATA__
05-FEB-12
10-MAR-11
22-AUG-11
26-FEB-12
10-NOV-12
07-JUN-11
20-APR-12
19-DEC-12
17-JAN-11
25-NOV-11
28-FEB-11
04-SEP-11
03-DEC-12
16-SEP-12
31-DEC-11
08-JUN-11
22-JUN-12
02-AUG-12
23-SEP-11
14-MAY-11

output

17-JAN-11
28-FEB-11
10-MAR-11
14-MAY-11
07-JUN-11
08-JUN-11
22-AUG-11
04-SEP-11
23-SEP-11
25-NOV-11
31-DEC-11
05-FEB-12
26-FEB-12
20-APR-12
22-JUN-12
02-AUG-12
16-SEP-12
10-NOV-12
03-DEC-12
19-DEC-12
share|improve this answer
    
It might be a good idea to use a Schwartzian transform here. (decorate-sort-undecorate) –  Brad Gilbert Jun 11 '12 at 22:06
3  
The Schwartzian transform is an optimisation, and optimisations should be applied only to code that isn't running fast enough. It would add to the volume of the code substantially and also be impregnable to beginner programmers. –  Borodin Jun 11 '12 at 22:15
    
@BradGilbert: Better than hand-writing a Schwartzian, just use List::UtilsBy sort_by; namely: nsort_by { Time::Piece->strptime($_, '%b-%d-%y') } @dates –  LeoNerd Jun 12 '12 at 10:41
    
@LeoNerd: I don't see that as a huge improvement over the built-in sort functionality, and it teaches nothing except how to use that module. Useful for getting it going but not for leaning Perl. –  Borodin Jun 12 '12 at 10:51
    
@BradGilbert: Primarily it ensures that strptime is called only O(n) times and not O(n log n) which would normally be the case with the naive sort function. –  LeoNerd Jun 12 '12 at 12:53

An easy way is to convert the dates to YYYYMMDD format that can be sorted lexicographically.

Note that MM should be the month represented as a two digit number.

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You could use the core module Time::Piece to convert the DD-MMM-YY (or any input format) to an ISO 8601 form. This allows simple sorting. This example builds up an array of raw data which includes the ISO value as a sort key; sorts it; and returns the data in sorted order:

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Time::Piece;
my $t;
my @data;
while (<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    $t = Time::Piece->strptime( $_, "%d %b %y" );
    push @data, [ $t->datetime, $_ ];    #...ISO 8601 format...
}
my @sorteddata = sort { $a->[0] cmp $b->[0] } @data;
for my $value (@sorteddata) {
    print $value->[1], "\n";
}
__DATA__
19 Feb 12
17 Aug 11
31 Mar 10
01 Aug 11
08 Apr 11
29 Feb 11
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Here's a possible way to do this using only basic Perl (no modules):

#! perl -w

use strict;

my @dates = ( '19-FEB-12', '15-APR-12', '13-JAN-11' );

# map month names to numbers
my %monthnum = ( 
    'JAN' => 1, 'FEB' => 2, 'MAR' => 3, 'APR' => 4,
    'MAY' => 5, 'JUN' => 6, 'JUL' => 7, 'AUG' => 8,
    'SEP' => 9, 'OCT' => 10, 'NOV' => 11, 'DEC' => 12 
    );


# sort the array using a helper function
my @sorted_dates = sort { convert_date($a) cmp convert_date($b) } @dates;

print join(", ", @sorted_dates), "\n";
# outputs: 13-JAN-11, 19-FEB-12, 15-APR-12

exit(0);

# THE END



# converts from 19-FEB-12 to 120219, for sorting
sub convert_date
{
    my $d1 = shift;
    my $d2;

    if ($d1 =~ /(\d{2})-([A-Z]{3})-(\d{2})/)
    {
        $d2 = sprintf( "%02d%02d%2d", $3, $monthnum{$2}, $1 );
    }
    else
    {
        die "Unrecognized format: $d1";
    }

    return $d2;
}

This relies on your dates being formatted correctly, but it should be trivial to add more validation.

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Using DateTime module; or use sort command with month option (*nix); or transform dd-mmm-yyyy to yyyymmdd and then sort;

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