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I have a situaion in which I want to declare a class member function returning a type that depends on the class itself. Let me give you an example:

class Substring {
    private:
        string the_substring_;
    public:
        // (...)
        static SubstringTree getAllSubstring(string main_string, int min_size);
};

And SubstringTree is defined as follows:

typedef set<Substring, Substring::Comparator> SubstringTree;

My problem is that if I put the SubstringTree definition after the Substring definition, the static method says it doesn't know SubstringTree. If I reverse the declarations, then the typedef says it doesn't know Substring.

How can I do it? Thanks in advance.

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2  
The "pre-declaring" is actually called "forward declaration", you'll be much more lucky and get better results using correct term. –  arul Jul 8 '09 at 15:23
    
Sorry, I actually forgot what the term was. And come to think about it, had I known what the term was, odds are I would know how do do what I was asking. =) –  Rafael Almeida Jul 8 '09 at 15:26
    
Which is why we should include "forward declaration" in answers or comments, so you'll know and any other C++ novice coming on this question should know. –  David Thornley Jul 8 '09 at 15:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could define it inside the class:

class Substring {
    private:
        string the_substring_;
    public:
        // (...)
        typedef set<Substring, Substring::Comparator> SubstringTree;
        static SubstringTree getAllSubstring(string main_string, int min_size);
};
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But then you have to refer to it with Substring::SubstringTree –  Zifre Jul 8 '09 at 15:22
2  
... which may not be a bad idea at all. It would help declutter the global namespace. I'd even go with Substring::Tree. –  Ates Goral Jul 8 '09 at 15:24
    
But then you can add another typedef outside the class that redefines it in the global scope –  shoosh Jul 8 '09 at 15:24
    
@Ates Goral: Yes, I think Substring::Tree would actually be the best solution, but Substring::SubstringTree is sort of redundant. –  Zifre Jul 8 '09 at 15:27
    
I'll go with Substring::Tree. Thanks! –  Rafael Almeida Jul 8 '09 at 15:34

As you've written it, the short answer is you can't.

You do have a few close alternatives:

1) Declare SubstringTree in Substring

class Substring {
public:
    class Comparator;
    typedef set< Substring, Comparator> Tree;

private:
    string the_substring_;
public:
    // (...)
    static Tree getAllSubstring(string main_string, int min_size);
};

typedef Substring::Tree SubstringTree;

2) Define the Comparator outside of Substring:

class Substring;
class SubstringComparator;
typedef set< Substring, SubstringComparator> SubstringTree;

class Substring {
public:

private:
    string the_substring_;
public:
    // (...)
    static SubstringTree getAllSubstring(string main_string, int min_size);
};

3) You can use a template to delay the lookup until you have more declarations:

template <typename String>
struct TreeHelper
{
  typedef set< String, typename String::Comparator> Tree;
};

class Substring {
public:
  class Comparator;

private:
  string the_substring_;
public:
  // (...)
  static TreeHelper<Substring>::Tree getAllSubstring(string main_string
                                             , int min_size);
};

typedef TreeHelper<Substring>::Tree SubstringTree;
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You can predeclare a class with this:

class Foo;

Keep in mind that before the class is actually defined, you can only declare pointers to it, not instances.

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Typical circular inclusion. –  dborba Jul 8 '09 at 15:24

forward declaration

class Substring;

I don't know if that will work for non pointer uses of Substring though.

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It doesn't, in general. –  David Thornley Jul 8 '09 at 15:32

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