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So I have a list of indices,

[0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10]

and want to convert it to this,

[[0, 3], [5], [7, 8], [10]]

this will run on a large number of indices.

Also, this technically isn't for slices in python, the tool I am working with is faster when given a range compared to when given the individual ids.

The pattern is based on being in a range, like slices work in python. So in the example, the 1 and 2 are dropped because they are already included in the range of 0 to 3. The 5 would need accessed individually since it is not in a range, etc. This is more helpful when a large number of ids get included in a range such as [0, 5000].

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2  
What is your pattern to loose some numbers and group others? If your task is too complex, then make up a smaller one for this exercise here and think about how to extend it to your problem, when you know how it works! Just giving you completely general advice won't help you, I think. –  erikb85 Jun 11 '12 at 21:33
    
Well, the pattern is based on being in a range, like slices work in python. So in the example, the 1 and 2 are dropped because they are already included in the range of 0 to 3. The 5 would need accessed individually since it is not in a range, etc. This is more helpful when a large number of ids get included in a range such as [0, 5000]. –  Saebin Jun 11 '12 at 21:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Since you want the code to be fast, I wouldn't try to be too fancy. A straight-forward approach should perform quite well:

a = [0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10]
it = iter(a)
start = next(it)
slices = []
for i, x in enumerate(it):
    if x - a[i] != 1:
        end = a[i]
        if start == end:
            slices.append([start])
        else:
            slices.append([start, end])
        start = x
if a[-1] == start:
    slices.append([start])
else:
    slices.append([start, a[-1]])

Admittedly, that's doesn't look too nice, but I expect the nicer solutions I can think of to perform worse. (I did not do a benchmark.)

Here is s slightly nicer, but slower solution:

from itertools import groupby
a = [0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10]
slices = []
for key, it in groupby(enumerate(a), lambda x: x[1] - x[0]):
    indices = [y for x, y in it]
    if len(indices) == 1:
        slices.append([indices[0]])
    else:
        slices.append([indices[0], indices[-1]])
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Thanks, works good... seemed like a simple problem, but was stumping me XD –  Saebin Jun 12 '12 at 0:39
def runs(seq):
    previous = None
    start = None
    for value in itertools.chain(seq, [None]):
        if start is None:
            start = value
        if previous is not None and value != previous + 1:
            if start == previous:
                yield [previous]
            else:
                yield [start, previous]
            start = value
        previous = value
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I like how it works with iterable types, and works fine in my case... but does assume a sorted sequence. Things like sets appear to sort integers automatically, but I am not sure how much this can be trusted. –  Saebin Jun 12 '12 at 0:43
    
@Saebin, yes it assumes a sorted sequence because that's what you used in your example. You can easily use seq.sorted() to pre-sort. A set is not sorted at all, if it appears to be it's only a coincidence, probably more likely with small numbers than large ones. –  Mark Ransom Jun 12 '12 at 2:00

Since performance is an issue go with the first solution by @SvenMarnach but here is a fun one liner split into two lines! :D

>>> from itertools import groupby, count
>>> indices = [0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10]
>>> [[next(v)] + list(v)[-1:]
     for k,v in groupby(indices, lambda x,c=count(): x-next(c))]
[[0, 3], [5], [7, 8], [10]]
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