Sign up ×
Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other. Join them; it only takes a minute:

I'm having trouble referencing a checkbox element from an array of element ids. Why can I reference it using a literal and string var as the parameter of getElementById, but not by using an element of an array?


<ul id="zip_wrapper">
<li><label><input type="checkbox" id="72002" value="72002" name="zip_codes[]" checked="checked">72002</label></li>
<li><label><input type="checkbox" id="72034" value="72034" name="zip_codes[]" checked="checked">72034</label></li>

var zips = "";
var tester = "72034";
zips = document.getElementById("zip_wrapper").innerText.split(" ");

//zips =; //a la

document.write("zips array, tokenized by split(\" \"): " + zips + "<br />");

document.write("document.getElementById(\"72034\").checked: " + document.getElementById("72034").checked + "<br />");
document.write("document.getElementById(tester).checked: " + document.getElementById(tester).checked + "<br />");
document.write("document.getElementById(zips[1]).checked: " + document.getElementById(zips[1]).checked + "<br />");


You can see the page in action here:

share|improve this question
The reason for why you can't use zips[1]? --> console.log(zips) or console.log(zips.length) ;) – Andreas Jun 11 '12 at 21:57
Firefox returns undefined for the "innerText" of the <ul> element ... – Pointy Jun 11 '12 at 22:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When I go to your test page, when I do

zips = document.getElementById("zip_wrapper").innerText.split(" ");

in the console, I'm getting zips as an element of length one, so zips[1] would be undefined. It seems (at least in Chrome) that innerText is returning each one on its own line. I split by \n and I got:

["72002", "72034", ""]

I think the bottom line is the issue isn't that you're using an element from an array, but that you array isn't made up like you are expecting it to be.

And as Pointy pointed out, it seems that Firefox just returns undefined and I found Chrome to return them on each their own line (i.e. separated with "\n" with an empty string at the end).

You might need a different approach to what you're trying to accomplish, but the answer to the original question, is that there's nothing wrong with using an array element as a parameter of getElementById.

share|improve this answer
That is a purposefully literal string, as in showing the javascript that I am trying to output. – user898763452 Jun 11 '12 at 21:57
No, that's not the problem; that part is just the label on the line he's printing out. – Pointy Jun 11 '12 at 21:58
yeah, I just realized I misread that part. I think the problem has to do with creating the zips array. zips[1] doesn't exist when he's outputting it as I'm seeing it. – CWSpear Jun 11 '12 at 21:58

The argument must be a string literal e.g.


so if you have an array of similar objects rather than just one,


then reference them like this

myobj="myhtmlobject[" + j + "]"
wanted= document.getElementById(myobj).value
share|improve this answer

Your Answer


By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.