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consider

a = ['1','2','3','4','5']
for(var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) { if (a[i] == 3) console.log('found it!') }

and

a = {'1': true, '2': true, '3': true, '4': true}
a['3']

Which will be faster and why?

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closed as not a real question by gdoron, Joseph the Dreamer, JasonSmith, random, Graviton Jun 13 '12 at 7:10

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4  
Why not try it yourself? Add both method in a loop to call it many times and time which one is faster! –  Veger Jun 11 '12 at 22:00
1  
The second one should be faster. –  gdoron Jun 11 '12 at 22:01
2  
Try it on JSPerf –  Joseph the Dreamer Jun 11 '12 at 22:01
2  
@JosephtheDreamer. Why if he can post this question and make someone else do it for him...? :( –  gdoron Jun 11 '12 at 22:02
1  
a.indexOf('3') - jsPerf –  Andreas Jun 11 '12 at 22:06

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

An object lookup will on average be much faster when trying to find a random element, especially when you are searching through a large number of items. This is because the underlying algorithm to do so is a B-tree search which has a time complexity of O(log n) and allows it to quickly look up an items membership without having to check it against each element in the object.

This is opposed to when searching in an array you must check each element before deciding if is not in the array which has a linear time complexity of O(n).

Here is the benchmark showing object lookup is faster: http://jsperf.com/array-vs-objv2/6

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Without knowing all the black magic workings of JavaScript, I can say that something like a['3'] does not use linear search.

Does JavaScript have a direct reference to that element so it doesn't even need to do a search? Maybe. And if it does, it uses that to find a['3'] faster than a linear search, even though it might cost a little more memory. (I think this is what it actually does.)

If it doesn't, it and it actually searches through your data structure, it almost certainly doesn't use a simple linear search. There's probably some inner workings, or some sort of binary tree search or some other confoundedness.

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I modified code like below to make both code equivalent before comparing their performance in jsPerf http://jsperf.com/array-vs-objv2

Test 1:

Test Setup:

var a = [];
var b = {};

for (var i = 1; i <= 100000; i++) {
   a.push(i);
   b[''+i] = true;
}

Using Arrays:

for(var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) { 
  if (a[i] === 99999) {
     console.log(true);
     return;
  }
}

Using Object: (Faster)

console.log(b['99999']);

Test 2:

Using Arrays: (Faster)

a = ['1','2','3','4','5']
for(var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) { 
  if (a[i] === 3) {
     console.log(true);
     return;
  }
}

Using Object:

a = {'1': true, '2': true, '3': true, '4': true, '5': true};
console.log(a['3']);

Resut: (As Trevor pointed out) The array search will be faster for fewer items, but when looking up on larger list.. the array is slower because of the linear search.

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This doesn't take into account large searches or random access. This is a better benchmark that reveals object lookup is indeed faster: jsperf.com/array-vs-objv2/6 –  Trevor Jun 11 '12 at 22:47
    
@Trevor You are right.. see updated post. Thanks for the correction. –  Vega Jun 11 '12 at 23:04

Check out this benchmark figure

The access time of object property and array item are close

In your first case, there are three times of access to the array item

And in your second case, there are only one time of access to the object property

So I think the second one should be faster

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FF3, IE7, Chrome1, Opera 9? Once upon a time there was... :D –  Andreas Jun 11 '12 at 22:16
    
@Andreas yeah it's pretty old.. but i assume the fundmental implementation of js hasn't changed much since then.. correct me if i'm wrong.. –  xvatar Jun 11 '12 at 22:18

The associative array will perform faster, it only requires one logical operation. Though to achieve this it requires more be stored in memory to link the key with the value. This is roughly equivalent to a hash table vs array argument.

The drawbacks, slower insertions and higher memory use. How fast lookups are depends on the engine.

https://developers.google.com/v8/design

Complete analysis of both setup and search: http://jsperf.com/array-vs-objv2/5

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1  
Associative arrays don't exist in JavaScript, only numerically indexed arrays and objects. Just a bit of nitpicking, –  Elias Van Ootegem Jun 11 '12 at 22:22
    
Speaking of functionality, an object in js is an associative array. –  aepheus Jun 11 '12 at 22:51
    
not quite: an object can have custom methods added to it, directly (not via prototype), and lacks the indexOf method, for example. Yes, an object can be the same thing as an associative array or struct in other languages, but we're talking about JS here. It's better to be a as anal as possible when it comes to terminology, otherwise people are inclined to treat objects & arrays as the same thing, which leads to problems, and general confusion. –  Elias Van Ootegem Jun 11 '12 at 23:36
a = {'1': true, '2': true, '3': true, '4': true}
if (a['3'] === true) {
  console.log("found it");
}

will be faster in the most cases, then

a = ['1','2','3','4','5']
for(var i = 0; i < a.length; i++) { 
  if (a[i] == 3) {
    console.log('found it!')
  }
}

Because the second one might need to loop through all values of the array.

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I love downvotes without any comment :-) –  TheHippo Jun 11 '12 at 22:03
    
in the first you would be testing for existence of the property. If '3' was not part of the object, it would be undefined –  aepheus Jun 11 '12 at 22:06
1  
and how is the first example found? It probably might to loop over all values as well, but internally/out-of-sight... –  Veger Jun 11 '12 at 22:09
    
it is found the same way "".indexOf() is found. –  aepheus Jun 11 '12 at 22:13
    
The author of the question doesn't seem like telling him that the first one will be faster because some kind of b-tree [O(log n)] is used to determine if the property exists other then looping over an array [O(n)] would help him a lot. –  TheHippo Jun 11 '12 at 22:16

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