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Everyone knows Show. But what about:

class ShowText a where
  showText :: a -> Text

I can't find this anywhere. Why?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The library text-show exists now and solves exactly this problem.

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The problem with creating the Text directly is you still need to know the overall size of the strict Text block before filling it in. You can do better with a Builder scheme and using Data.Text.Lazy. Dan Doel does this in bytestring-show, but I'm not aware of an equivalent for Text.

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Speaking of read/show functions... Can a pair of ("read function which may fail","show function") for a given datatype be turned into a Prism from Control.Lens ? –  danidiaz Aug 15 '13 at 10:12
    
Yep! You need the ability to run the Read and get out whether it matched or not, which was only added recently to base though. –  Edward Kmett Aug 17 '13 at 17:00

For the particular case of Int values, here's the code to convert them into strict Text values without using Strings in an intermediate stage:

import Data.Text
import Data.Text.Lazy (toStrict)
import Data.Text.Lazy.Builder (toLazyText)
import Data.Text.Lazy.Builder.Int (decimal)

showIntegral :: Integral a => a -> T.Text
showIntegral = toStrict. toLazyText . decimal

Module Data.Text.Lazy.Builder.RealFloat offers similar functionality for floating point values.

With these we can define a our own version of the Show typeclass:

import Data.Text
import Data.Text.Lazy (toStrict)
import Data.Text.Lazy.Builder (toLazyText)
import Data.Text.Lazy.Builder.Int (decimal)
import Data.Text.Lazy.Builder.RealFloat (realFloat)

class ShowText a where
    showText :: a -> Text

instance ShowText Int where
    showText = toStrict . toLazyText . decimal

instance ShowText Float where
    showText = toStrict . toLazyText . realFloat

Then we can start adding more instances (one for tuples would be useful for example).

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It's trivial to write your own function piggybacking off Show:

showText :: Show a => a -> Text
showText = pack . show
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8  
Does this have a performance hit? i.e., aren't I creating a big String then converting it to a Text, rather than creating the Text directly? –  jameshfisher Jun 11 '12 at 22:37
1  
Don't you loose all gains of using Data.Text this way? You use Text mainly because of String's prefromance issues - and this way you throw all gains off... –  Sventimir May 31 at 7:15

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