Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an application which uses code that produces various types of objects and data structures, returning them as Object instances, and would like a generic way of establishing whether any of those objects is "empty" (or null).

(This is not a matter of design, or of whether such a method should be used, but a question of optimizing the solution to an existing requirement.)

So, here is a simple go:

public static boolean isEmpty(Object content)
{
    if (content == null)
    {
        return true;
    }
    else if (content instanceof CharSequence)
    {
        return (((CharSequence)content).length() == 0);
    }
    else if (content instanceof Collection<?>)
    {
        return ((Collection<?>)content).isEmpty();
    }
    else if (content instanceof Object[])
    {
        return (((Object[])content).length == 0);
    }
    else  // Use reflection (an exaggeration, for demo purposes)
    {
        try
        {
            Method isEmpty = content.getClass().
                             getDeclaredMethod("isEmpty", (Class<?>[])null);
            if (isEmpty != null)
            {
                Object result = isEmpty.invoke(content, (Object[])null);

                if (result instanceof Boolean)
                {
                    return (Boolean)result;
                }
            }
        }
        catch (Exception e)
        {
        }
    }

    return false;
}

Any ideas for potential improvements, in terms of either performance, or coverage?

For instance, reflection could be also used to establish whether the object has a length() or size() method, invoke it and see if the result is 0. (In reality, reflection is probably too much, but I am including it here for completeness.)

Is there a top-level class very commonly used, which has a length() or size() method, instead of the isEmpty() method, to include in the above case, similarly to Collection that has isEmpty()?

share|improve this question
6  
At a glance, the use of such a method alone seems like a bad design decision. How will this be used? –  Paul Bellora Jun 11 '12 at 23:08
    
It is used to check the "emptiness" of an Object, returned by a non-changeable method that produces numerous different types of data. –  PNS Jun 11 '12 at 23:17
3  
Why? If you're calling this method you should probably already know what object you're passing to it, just call isEmpty on the object itself and save yourself the trouble. –  Jeffrey Jun 11 '12 at 23:20
    
It is not about passing an Object to the method, but getting an Object from it. The return type is not known, it is just an Object! –  PNS Jun 11 '12 at 23:21
    
Are you sure you want to define "empty" for arrays as length==0? One doesn't normally go around creating zero-length arrays. In fact, does "empty" have a well-defined meaning for arrays without some extra metadata? –  Jim Garrison Jun 11 '12 at 23:30
show 5 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Instead of the ugly instanceofs, split up the method into several methods with the same name but different args. e.g.

static boolean isEmpty(Object[] array)
static boolean isEmpty(Collection collection)
static boolean isEmpty(CharSequence cs)

Instead of reflection, if you really want your own interface for special objects, declare that interface, and then, for consistency with the above, offer the static utility

static boolean isEmpty(IMayBeEmpty imbe);
share|improve this answer
    
Not only that, but you can then include some of the commons lang isEmpty methods as well. Decreasing the amount of code you have to write. –  Jim Barrows Jun 11 '12 at 23:52
    
Still, it smells (doesn't mean it's not justified or unavoidable). But that's the most elegant solution I can think of. –  ptyx Jun 11 '12 at 23:53
    
@Jim You are right that overloading is better than using instanceof, but since the declared return type is Object, only the isEmpty() method with the Object argument will be called. Does the "commons lang" code you mentioned refer to the Apache Commons? –  PNS Jun 12 '12 at 0:30
    
I concur with PNS. When virtual method binding is done in an overloaded scenario, it's done at compile time based on the declared types of the parameters. In this case, if what you're passing into the isEmpty() method is declared as Object, then you'll only ever call isEmpty(Object), regardless of the real type. You could do some reflection work however here. See my answer below. –  Matt Jun 12 '12 at 4:23
    
Hmm, I guess I missed the part where the argument is really defined as an Object, not a Collection, String[] etc... In that case @Matt is correct, the compiler doesn't know any better. You'd need instanceof or some sort of double-dispatch. –  user949300 Jun 12 '12 at 18:40
show 1 more comment

This method would at least solve your problem of the generic isEmpty(Object) problem. However, you don't get compile time safety with this, and calling it without the method existing for the exact type requested will yield a runtime error. Note the "MethodUtils" class is from apache commons-beanutils, though you could easily use reflection directly, but for the sake of simplicity, i'm using beanutils here.

The "invokeExactcMethod" method looks for a static method in the given class with the given name that has the compatible parameters of the object array being passed. So if the runtime type of the object is ArrayList, it would look for isEmpty(ArrayList) then isEmpty(AbstractList) then isEmpty(List). It then invokes that method if it can find it, otherwise it throws a NoSuchMethodException.

public class MyUtility {
  static boolean isEmpty(Object object) {
    if (object == null) {
      return true;
    }
    else {
      try {
        return MethodUtils.invokeStaticMethod(
                  MyUtility.class, "isEmpty", new Object[]{object});
      }
      catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(e);
      }
      catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
        throw new IllegalArgumentException(e);
      }
      catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
        throw new RuntimeException(e);
      }
    }
  }
}

the "invokeExactStaticMethod" is more deterministic and doesn't use assignment compatibility, but exact signature matching. That means isEmpty(List) would never match anything because you can't construct anything of that type.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice answer, thanks! But wouldn't it be faster to have the instanceofs, especially if the anticipated data types are CharSequence, Collection<?> or array of any type? –  PNS Jun 12 '12 at 9:30
    
it's likely that MethodUtils is going to cache the answers, but yes, it might be faster. However than means that everytime you add a new isEmpty method, you have to alter the one with the big IF clause. With this solution, you simply have to add the new method. I'm all for less error prone code, and I think this is less error prone. You'll believe me the first time you try to add a new method and forget the if clause. –  Matt Jun 12 '12 at 14:35
    
Very reasonable approach. Thanks again. –  PNS Jun 12 '12 at 16:44
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.