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Have a problem with cyrillic character comparison in Python. Here is the small testcase%

#!/usr/bin/env python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

def convert(text):
    result = []
    for i in xrange(len(text)):
        if text[i].lower() == 'й':
            result.append('q')
    print result

if __name__ == '__main__':
    convert('йцукенг')

You definitely see, that the first character should be equal to the character in the condition. But the condition fails and result is empty.

Also if I try to print whole string (text) it works well, but if I try to print just a character (like text[2]) — I get '?' in the output.

I'm sure the problem is with encoding, but how can I do correct comparison of separate characters?

share|improve this question
    
Does the terminal you are using support these characters? –  Lattyware Jun 11 '12 at 23:34
    
Yes, whole string is printed correctly. –  Anton Vernigor Jun 11 '12 at 23:36
    
Sorry, I missed that. –  Lattyware Jun 11 '12 at 23:36
1  
I'm going to keep posting this link a few times a day until it's no longer needed: bit.ly/unipain - Additionally, your for loop can just be for char in text: if char.lower()... –  Daenyth Jun 11 '12 at 23:59

2 Answers 2

You are seeing this behavior because you are looping over the bytes in a UTF-8 string, not over the characters. Here is an example of the difference:

>>> 'й'               # note that this is two bytes
'\xd0\xb9'
>>> 'йцукенг'[0]      # but when you loop you are looking at a single byte
'\xd0'
>>> len('йцукенг')    # 7 characters, but 14 bytes
14

This is why it is necessary to use Unicode for checking the character, as in mVChr's answer.

These easiest way to do this is to leave all of your code exactly the same, and just add a u prefix to all of your string literals (u'йцукенг' and u'й').

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+1. This is a good 'why' answer. –  Lattyware Jun 11 '12 at 23:41
    
Thank you! Now I see it was clear from the very beginning :) –  Anton Vernigor Jun 11 '12 at 23:49

Presuming you're using Python 2.X, you should use unicode strings, try:

#!/usr/bin/env python
# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

def convert(text):
    result = []
    for i in xrange(len(text)):
        if text[i].lower() == unicode('й', 'utf8'):
            result.append('q')
    print result

if __name__ == '__main__':
    convert(unicode('йцукенг', 'utf8'))

Or you can simply enter the raw unicode strings of u'йцукенг' and u'й'

share|improve this answer
    
This presumes he isn't using 3.x. –  Lattyware Jun 11 '12 at 23:37
    
Thanks, updated answer. –  mVChr Jun 11 '12 at 23:38
    
@Lattyware: The code sample in the question is 2.x. (Note the print statement without parentheses.) –  dan04 Jun 11 '12 at 23:38
    
@dan04 You make an excellent point. I'm not doing well today for spotting things. –  Lattyware Jun 11 '12 at 23:39
    
That's it! I use 2.6.1 (just already installed on my OS), the task is too small to install anything else. I have to understand encoding treatment once and forever, because I often meet cyrillic, but I still meet simple problems again and again. –  Anton Vernigor Jun 11 '12 at 23:43

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