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I am getting an unexpected Access Violation error in the following code:

program Project65;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

{$R *.res}

uses
  SysUtils;

type
  ITest = interface
  end;

  TTest = class(TInterfacedObject, ITest)
  end;

var
  p: ^ITest;

begin
  GetMem(p, SizeOf(ITest)); 
  p^ := TTest.Create; // AV here
  try
  finally
    p^ := nil;
    FreeMem(p);
  end;
end.

I know that interfaces should be used differently. However I am working on a legacy codebase which uses this approach. And I was very surprised to see that it is not sufficient to reserve SizeOf(ITest) memory to put an ITest there.

Now interestingly if I change the first line to

GetMem(p, 21);

than the AV is gone. (20 bytes or less fails). What is the explanation to this?

(I am using Delphi XE2 Update 4 + HotFix)

Please don't comment on how horrible the code is or suggest how this could be coded properly. Instead please answer why is it necessary to reserve 21 bytes instead of SizeOf(ITest) = 4?

share|improve this question
    
AV = access violation? –  kol Jun 11 '12 at 23:35
    
Your code looks really strange. Why do you need "^ITest" and the GetMem/FreeMem pair? TTest is a descendant of TInterfacedObject, so p should be simply an ITest. It is reference-counted, so it will be destroyed automatically when it gets out of scope. There is no need to use GetMem/FreeMem. –  kol Jun 11 '12 at 23:41
1  
This is the totally incorrect way to work with interfaces. Can you explain what it is you're hoping to accomplish, so that maybe someone can point you in a better direction? –  Ken White Jun 11 '12 at 23:58
    
1. AV = Access Violation 2. I know that this should not be used like this. I am trying to understand a legacy code I have to work with where this was a common practice. May I ask to spare comments how bad this code is and instead try to answer the question? –  RM. Jun 12 '12 at 0:11
    
@Ken, I think you analisys is incorrect. Sometimes interfaces are assigned to pointers to get weak references. In this example reference counting is working properly. It gets increased when the interface is assigned to p^ and gets decreased when p^ is set to nil (at which point the object is destroyed). –  RM. Jun 12 '12 at 0:25
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1 Answer

up vote 24 down vote accepted

What you have effectively written is doing the following logic behind the scenes:

var
  p: ^ITest;
begin
  GetMem(p, SizeOf(ITest));
  if p^ <> nil then p^._Release; // <-- AV here
  PInteger(p)^ := ITest(TTest.Create);
  p^._AddRef;
  ...
  if p^ <> nil then p^._Release;
  PInteger(p)^ := 0;
  FreeMem(p);
end;

GetMem() is not guaranteed to zero out what it allocates. When you assign the new object instance to the interface varaiable, if the bytes are not zeros, the RTL will think there is already an existing interface reference and will try to call its _Release() method, causing the AV since it is not backed by a real object instance. You need to zero out the allocated bytes beforehand, then the RTL will see a nil interface reference and not try to call its _Release() method anymore:

program Project65;

{$APPTYPE CONSOLE}

{$R *.res}

uses
  SysUtils;

type
  ITest = interface
  end;

  TTest = class(TInterfacedObject, ITest)
  end;

var              
  p: ^ITest;              

begin              
  GetMem(p, SizeOf(ITest));               
  try
    FillChar(p^, SizeOf(ITest), #0); // <-- add this!
    p^ := TTest.Create; // <-- no more AV
    try
      ...
    finally
      p^ := nil;
    end;
  finally
    FreeMem(p);
  end;
end.
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Remy, well explained –  RM. Jun 12 '12 at 2:14
6  
Or use AllocMem instead of GetMem+FreeMem –  Andreas Hausladen Jun 12 '12 at 6:07
    
Correction: I meant GetMem+FillChar. The FreeMem ist still necessary for AllocMem. –  Andreas Hausladen Jun 12 '12 at 8:32
4  
Or use New and Dispose. –  Craig Young Jun 12 '12 at 18:47
    
@Craig: Indeed, they should be the first choice. And they do initialize to nil where that is necessary. –  Rudy Velthuis Jun 16 '12 at 2:05
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