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I have the following method that returns void and I need to use it in another method that also returns void. Can I do the following?

public void doSomething(){}

public void myMethod()
{
    return doSomething();
}

Thanks for all your comments, but le me be more specific

I only doSomething if something happens, otherwise I do other things

public void doSomething(){}

public void myMethod()
{
    for(...)
        if(somethingHappens)
        {
            doSomething();
            return;
        }

    doOtherStuff();
}

Instead of the code above, can I just write "return doSomething();" inside the if statement?

}
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2  
Also, make sure you keep your capitalization right. Return should be return and Public should be public. –  kentcdodds Jun 11 '12 at 23:47
    
Please check out my updated answer. –  kol Jun 12 '12 at 11:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

No, just do this:

public void doSomething() { }

public void myMethod()
{
    doSomething();
}

or in the second case:

public void doSomething() { }

public void myMethod()
{
    // ...
    if (somethingHappens)
    {
        doSomething();
        return;
    }
    // ...
}

"Returning void" means returning nothing. If you would like to "jump" out of myMethod's body, use return; The compiler does not allow writing return void; ("illegal start of expression") or return doSomething(); ("cannot return a value from method whose result type is void"). I understand it seems logical to return "void" or the "void result" of a method call, but such a code would be misleading. I mean most programmers who read something like return doSomething(); would think there is something to return.

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void functions don't/can't return anything as such. Simply call the function.

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No, returns are unnecessary in Java void functione. Instead, do this:

public void myMethod(){
    doSomething();
}

You could put a return after doSomething() if you wanted, but as I said it'd be unnecessary.

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Dang, kol got to it while I was typing. –  MattS Jun 11 '12 at 23:48

You either have to just use doSoemthing like the others have pointed out OR

public (insert data type like int, double, string, etc) myMethod()
{
     return doSomething();
}

If do something returns an int

// if you wanted to take 2 numbers and add them

public void myMethod()
{
    valueOfX+Y = doSomething();
}

public int doSomething()
{
    x = 2;
    y = 2;
    return X+Y;
}

hope that clears it up

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