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Hey guys I wanted to create a JScrollPane but it won't work... and I don't know why... here's my code...

public class test extends JFrame{
    public test(){      
        setSize(1000,600);

    }

    private static JButton[] remove;
    private static JPanel p = new JPanel();

    public static void main(String[]args){
        p.setLayout(null);
        JFrame t=new test();
        remove = new JButton[25];
        for(int i=0;i<25;i++){
            remove[i]=new JButton("Remove");
            remove[i].setBounds(243,92+35*i,85,25);
            p.add(remove[i]);       
        }
        JScrollPane scrollPane = new JScrollPane(p);
        scrollPane.setVerticalScrollBarPolicy(JScrollPane.VERTICAL_SCROLLBAR_AS_NEEDED);
        t.add(scrollPane);
        t.setVisible(true);
    }

Umm and Im pretty sure the frame isn't big enough for these 25 buttons... But if i delete that p.setLayout(null); A horizontal scroll bar will be created automatically... I don't really know what is wrong with my code... Pls help thank you very much!

share|improve this question
1  
Try calling t.pack‌​. I also suggest you find a suitable LayoutManager instead of using a null LayoutManager, null LayoutManagers are almost always a bad idea. – Jeffrey Jun 12 '12 at 0:45
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to set p's preferredSize for this to work.

  p.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(800, 2000));

Or you could have p extend JPanel and then override the getPreferredSize() method to return the proper dimension.

And I agree -- get rid of your null layouts. Learn about and use the layout managers if you want to use Swing correctly and have robust Swing GUI's.

e.g.,

import java.awt.*;
import java.awt.event.*;
import javax.swing.*;

public class Foo extends JFrame {

   private static final int BUTTON_COUNT = 25;

   public static void main(String[] args) {
      JPanel btnPanel = new JPanel(new GridLayout(0, 1, 0, 20));
      btnPanel.setBorder(BorderFactory.createEmptyBorder(20, 20, 20, 20));
      AbstractAction removeAction = new AbstractAction("Remove") {

         @Override
         public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent evt) {
            JButton src = (JButton) evt.getSource();
            JPanel container = (JPanel) src.getParent();
            container.remove(src);
            container.revalidate();
            container.repaint();
         }
      };
      for (int i = 0; i < BUTTON_COUNT; i++) {
         JButton removeBtn = new JButton(removeAction);
         btnPanel.add(removeBtn);
      }
      JPanel borderPanel = new JPanel(new BorderLayout());
      borderPanel.add(btnPanel, BorderLayout.NORTH);
      JScrollPane scrollpane = new JScrollPane(borderPanel,
            JScrollPane.VERTICAL_SCROLLBAR_ALWAYS,
            JScrollPane.HORIZONTAL_SCROLLBAR_NEVER);
      scrollpane.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(400, 800));

      JFrame frame = new JFrame("Foo");
      frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
      frame.getContentPane().add(scrollpane);
      frame.pack();
      frame.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
      frame.setVisible(true);
   }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Ohh i've tried GridLayout before. As far as I remember, a button just fills up the whole grid doesn't it? However, if i just setLayout(null), i can actually put everything wherever i want so... Not sure :P Oh and thank you very much for helping me twice! I'm so grateful that everyone here is always willing to help THANKS GUYS! – b321234 Jun 12 '12 at 1:04
1  
@b321234: Don't throw out a tool just because you don't understand how to use it fully yet. You can see for yourself how your layouts are failing you. Experiment, study, and you will find layouts indispensable. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 12 '12 at 1:05
    
@b321234:please see edit above for an example. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 12 '12 at 1:08
    
WOW.... It is AWESOME and so pro!! I don't really know how to use words express my gratitude now... Thank you X3! – b321234 Jun 12 '12 at 1:15

The issue is that a scroll pane checks the component inside it for a "preferred size" so a pane with a null layout has a preferred size of (0,0). Which it ignores.

You should do something along the lines of:

p.setPreferredSize(1000,600);

And you should see some scroll bars appear, I'm not sure how accurate they will be though.

share|improve this answer
    
Incorrect. Because the layout is null, the setBounds method sets the locations of the JButton to the pseudo-rectangles passed in the parameter. In other words, the buttons are in a column. – Vulcan Jun 12 '12 at 0:52
    
@Vulcan: possibly correct. The JScrollPane does not handle null layout using viewport views very well. – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Jun 12 '12 at 0:53
    
@HovercraftFullOfEels It seems Chad is referring to the layout of the buttons. – Vulcan Jun 12 '12 at 0:53
    
oic..... but i have so many other labels to show and they are at different locations.. I have never used gridLayout before I think i should go find some tutorials THANKS anyways ;) – b321234 Jun 12 '12 at 0:54
    
@Vulcan: I totally missed that part of the loop. And I did a little more research. The "clearer" explanation is that because a null layout has a (0,0) preferred size, the scroll pane will not ever make the scroll bars. (It's like a null preferred size). I am revising my answer to work for him. – Chad Campbell Jun 12 '12 at 1:03

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