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I'm trying to implement a running median algorithm using counting select and have got stuck.

The sequence to be analysed is called 'mySequence' and I have created 2 global variables; vectors of data and counts. Data is what mySequence gets transferred to one by one and counts is the count of each element.

I fear I may have got this completely wrong or an missing an important step.

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;
int maximum = 0;
vector<int> data;
vector<int> counts;
vector<int>::iterator it;

/*
 * A Program that calculates and outputs the running median of a sequence of values
 */

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// This function prints the running median of a sequence of values past to it
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

void runningMedian(int element, int k) { // vector<int> &data
    maximum = data.size(); // finds how many data elements are to be processed  

    for (int i = 0; i <= maximum; i++) // this creates the counts for each element
    {
        counts[element] += 1;
    }

    int c = 0;
    while (k >= 0) {
        k -= counts[c++];
        }
    cout << c - 1;

}

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
// This main function uses test data to test the above functions
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

int main(int argc, char** argv) {

    int mySequence [] = {7, 9, 3, 8, 0, 2, 4, 8, 3, 9}; // test sequence
    for (int i = 1; i <= 10; i++) counts.push_back(0); // This initialises the counts vector all to 0

    /// prints out the sequence of the data ///
    cout << "Sequence: ";
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        cout << mySequence[i] << " ";
    }
    cout << endl;
    /// /// /// /// ///


    cout << "Running Medians: ";
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) {
        data.push_back(mySequence[i]); // puts sequence into vector 1 by 1
        runningMedian(mySequence[i], (data.size() / 2));
        cout << " ";
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Is this homework? – John Jun 12 '12 at 0:46
    
Yes it is. I have tried by best up till this point. – Kate Jun 12 '12 at 0:51

This looks like a mistake:

void runningMedian(int element, int k) { // vector<int> &data
    maximum = data.size(); // finds how many data elements are to be processed  

    for (int i = 0; i <= maximum; i++) // this creates the counts for each element
    {
        counts[element] += 1;
    }

I get worried when I see a for loop iterate i=0; i<= ... -- that will actually iterate through maximum+1 times, not maximum times. (Idiomatic is i=0; i< ....) This is often a fast route to a buffer overflow or uninitialized memory access -- but since you're not even using i in this case, it can't have that impact. I presume you meant i instead of element -- otherwise why even bother with the loop? This could be re-written without the loop like this:

counts[element] += (maximum + 1);

(You can see why I think you probably meant to use i as an array index.)

Nothing else stands out to me, but perhaps I've overlooked it too.

share|improve this answer
    
oh, that was it! I hadn't removed the loop from when the code processed all elements together! Thank you, thank you! – Kate Jun 12 '12 at 0:54

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