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I have a need for two slightly different classes, that have the same members, but one of the classes needs to have less interaction possibilities by the user. I am hoping to inherit the second class from the first.
Is there a way to restrict access to parent methods from the child class, so that if somebody creates a child object, they will not be able to access certain parent class methods (which are public in the parent class)?

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1  
Not in the way you are thinking, no. –  saluce Jun 12 '12 at 1:44
    
No, but if you give a more concrete example you may get some better ideas. –  Chris Shain Jun 12 '12 at 1:46
    
Even if you could restrict what members are available on the child class, the user could still cast it as the parent and get at the parent functionality. Your best bet is following RJ Lohan's answer, but you then run into usability issues, since your users will need to know what functionality is useable in the child class. –  Jon Senchyna Jun 12 '12 at 1:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You should have a base abstract class to hold the things in common of both classes, and then let the other two classes inherit from it and add methods and properties, etc.

abstract class MyBaseClass
{
    public int SharedProperty { get; set; }

    public void SharedMethod()
    {
    }
}

class MyClass1 : MyBaseClass
{
    public void Method1()
    {
    }
}

class MyClass2 : MyBaseClass
{
    public void Method2()
    {
    }
}

MyClass1 has: SharedProperty, SharedMethod, and Method1.

MyClass2 has: SharedProperty, SharedMethod, and Method2.

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No, and here's why:

class Animal { 
   public void Speak() { Console.WriteLine("..."); }
}

class Dog : Animal { 
   remove void Speak();  // pretend you can do this
}

Animal a = GetAnAnimal(); // who knows what this does

a.Speak();  // It's not known at compile time whether this is a Dog or not
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Nice example, that makes perfect sense as to why what I want can't happen. –  3Pi Jun 12 '12 at 1:50

Not exactly, no. The closest you could come would be to provide virtual methods in the base (parent) class and override/new those in the derived (child) class, and provide no behaviour, or exceptions as appropriate;

public class Base
{
    public virtual void DoSomething()
    { . . . }
}

public class Derived : Base
{
    public override void DoSomething()
    { 
        throw new NotSupportedException("Method not valid for Derived");
    }
}
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Edited to throw NotSupportedException rather than InvalidOperationException, as it is more standard and logical, and added missing inheritance of Base. –  Yorye Nathan Jun 12 '12 at 1:59

Create the base class, and make the methods that should be hidden protected.

Create an interface that declares the methods you want public

Create a child class, inherited from the base class, and explicitly implement the interface. Call the protected methods from the interface implementation methods.

Then a user of the child class can only see members of the interface (this requires them to cast the instance as the interface)

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