Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a source code in C.

#include <stdio.h>
#define IN_W 1
#define OUT_W 0
#define SPACE 32
#define TAB 9

int main() { 
    int c, state, temp;
    state = OUT_W;

    while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {
        if ((c != SPACE || c != TAB) && (state == OUT_W)) {
            state = IN_W;
            temp = c;
            c = 13;
            putchar(c);
            c = 10;
            putchar(c);
            putchar(temp);          
        } else if (c != SPACE || c != TAB)
            putchar(c);     
        else 
            state = OUT_W;      
    }   
    return 0;
}

What I want to achieve is I will type in some characters/words and catch those inputs by getchar. When ever getchar receive any characters besides space or tab, it will print a new line and then print those characters until it found a space or tab (abandon them). For example, when I type

123  eat    4bananas     in themorning

the program will print

123
eat
4bananas
in
themorning

I tried to integrate it with CR or LF, but it still print "123 eat 4bananas in themorning".

My questions are: 1. What did I miss? 2. In the last 'else', which one is more efficient for the running program:

    else 
        state = OUT_W;

or

    else if ((c == SPACE || c == TAB) && state == IN_W)
        state = OUT_W;
    else
        continue;        // or can I use single ';' since we do nothing in here?

That's all. Thank you for your help.

Note: I tried playing with '\n' and '\t' too.

Regards, Mario

share|improve this question
    
Don't use "magic numbers" like 10 and 13 for character constants. Just use ' ' for space, '\t' for tab, and '\n' for newline. If you need the return character, you could use '\r' -- but you don't; writing '\n' to stdout will automatically generate the correct end-of-line sequence for your system, whether it's LF or CR LF. –  Keith Thompson Jun 12 '12 at 2:31
    
Unless you're on a UNIX box talking to a device that requires DOS EOL characteristics of course :-) –  paxdiablo Jun 12 '12 at 2:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For a start:

(c != SPACE || c != TAB)

is always true. A character cannot be both space and tab at the same time, hence it must always be either a non-tab or non-space. I suspect you meant:

(c != SPACE && c != TAB)

That's why the state is never going back to OUT_W, because after the first line end sequence, the second if statement is always true, so it will never get to that final else bit.

The following code works okay:

#include <stdio.h>
#define IN_W 1
#define OUT_W 0
#define SPACE 32
#define TAB 9

int main (void) {
    int c, state, temp;
    state = OUT_W;

    while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {
        if ((c != SPACE && c != TAB) && (state == OUT_W)) {
            state = IN_W;
            temp = c;
            c = 13;
            putchar(c);
            c = 10;
            putchar(c);
            putchar(temp);
        } else if (c != SPACE && c != TAB)
            putchar(c);
        else
            state = OUT_W;
    }
    return 0;
}

although it still has that annoying initial newline, which you can fix by simply setting the initial state to IN_W.

There's also a lot of magic numbers in your code and some rather unnecessary moving of values. Possibly a more polished version would be:

#include <stdio.h>

#define IN_W 1
#define OUT_W 0

#define SPACE ' '
#define TAB '\t'
#define CR '\r'
#define LF '\n'

int main (void) {
    int c, state;

    state = IN_W;
    while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {
        if ((c != SPACE) && (c != TAB) && (state == OUT_W)) {
            putchar(CR);
            putchar(LF);
            putchar(c);
            state = IN_W;
        } else if ((c != SPACE) && (c != TAB))
            putchar(c);
        else
            state = OUT_W;
    }

    return 0;
}

One thing I will mention is that it's often preferable to separate the state machine itself from the actions carried out. To that end, I would make the primary choice based on the current state rather than the character/state pair, and separate the actions for each state from the state machine.

I think that makes things a lot more readable, and easier to modify:

#include <stdio.h>

enum tState { ST_WORD, ST_SPACE };

static enum tState doWord (int ch) {
    if ((ch == ' ') || (ch == '\t')) {
        putchar ('\r');
        putchar ('\n');
        return ST_SPACE;
    }
    putchar (ch);
    return ST_WORD;
}

static enum tState doSpace (int ch) {
    if ((ch == ' ') || (ch == '\t'))
        return ST_SPACE;
    putchar (ch);
    return ST_WORD;
}

int main (void) {
    int ch;
    enum tState state = ST_WORD;

    while ((ch = getchar()) != EOF) {
        switch (state) {
            case ST_WORD:  state = doWord  (ch); break;
            case ST_SPACE: state = doSpace (ch); break;
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, it's really an enlightenment I got. I will play with your suggestion. I think I need more exercise to train my logic and to get better understanding in how to use programming to solve my problem. Thank-you. –  user1450146 Jun 12 '12 at 3:45

This expression is not what you want: (c != SPACE || c != TAB)

This is always true. If c is SPACE then it is not TAB, so the second part would be true. If c is TAB then it is not SPACE so the first part would be true.

In both cases, what you want is (c != SPACE && c != TAB) This is only true when c is not SPACE and also not TAB. The operator && is Boolean "and".

Also, I suggest that instead of magic numbers like 13 you should use C character constants like '\r'.

As for your second question, your program is not too bad as written. I definitely don't think you would improve it by putting in a continue and I don't even quite see how it would work. (As you noted, if the else continue; is at the very end of the loop, you can leave out the continue; actually, you could then just chop off the whole else, because else; does nothing.)

You have written a little state machine. You have three interesting cases:

  • in state OUT_W, need to transition to state IN_W (And here is where you print the CR/LF to go to the next line)
  • in state IN_W, found another character, stay in IN_W (here you print the character)
  • in state IN_W, found a tab or space so need to transition to state OUT_W

There is a fourth possibility:

  • in state OUT_W, found another tab or space, stay in OUT_W (handled just fine by the third case)

If you want the most efficient code, I think it would be best to rearrange it so that you only need to check for SPACE and TAB in one place:

while ((c = getchar()) != EOF) {
    if (c == SPACE || c == TAB) {
        state = OUT_W;
    }
    else {
        /* c is not SPACE or TAB so we will print it */
        if (state == OUT_W) {
            /* transition from OUT_W to IN_W */
            state = IN_W;
            putchar('\r');
            putchar('\n');
            putchar(c);
        }
        else 
            putchar(c);
    }
}

And with this restructured version of the code, it becomes clear that any time you are in IN_W you print the character, but only on the transition you print the CR/LF. So you could shorten this to not have an else, always call putchar(c);, but do that after the check for the transition. I will leave that as an exercise for you.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm glad I made mistakes. I never thought about '\r' character before and the OR expression usage really slip through my mind. Thank-you for your time. –  user1450146 Jun 12 '12 at 3:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.