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Setup: I have this program in c++:

#include <windows.h>
using namespace std;
int main(){
    HWND window;
    AllocConsole();
    window = FindWindowA("ConsoleWindowClass", NULL);
    ShowWindow(window,0);
while (1){  
if (GetKeyState('A'))
        {
    system("start love.mp3");
    return 0;
        }
    }
return 0;
}

So the program runs as a process and waits until the key A is pressed. And then it plays the love.mp3 file :)

However, when the program is waiting it uses up 25% of the CPU usage.

Qustion: Is there a way to reduce this so that the program doesn't consume so much of the CPU?

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5  
Easy option: add some sort of sleep in that while loop(not sure how to do this in Windows). Hard option: find out how to do async io in Windows and use that. Go with the easy option. –  Lalaland Jun 12 '12 at 3:20
    
Put a Sleep (50); in the loop. –  chris Jun 12 '12 at 3:22
    
@EthanSteinberg But couldn't that method "miss" one, since the user can type 'a' then another key in quick succession, then GetKeyState('A') wouldn't return true. –  Hassan Jun 12 '12 at 3:23
    
The program is only using 25% CPU because you have a quad core processor (or a hyperthreaded dual core). It would've been fun trying to kill this on a single core machine. –  Praetorian Jun 12 '12 at 3:26
    
@Prætorian, Been there, done that. –  chris Jun 12 '12 at 3:26

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Calling Sleep in the loop is sort of effective, but IMO, it's clearly the wrong way to go.

Instead, I'd do a blocking read, then check if the result was A, and do your thing when it is:

while ((ch = getch()) != EOF)
    if (ch == 'A') {
        system("start love.mp3");
        break;
    }

This won't miss keystrokes, and it'll use even less CPU time than a loop that calls Sleep.

share|improve this answer
    
@chris: That's another advantage: it doesn't ignore keyboard focus. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 12 '12 at 3:30
    
True, I guess that sounds like what the OP wanted. –  chris Jun 12 '12 at 3:31
    
This sounds even better! –  Thomas Jun 12 '12 at 3:32
    
One semi-unrelated question. Is it ok to use return 0; instead of the break; ? –  Thomas Jun 12 '12 at 3:42
3  
@Thomas, the break is going straight to the return afterwards. The difference is that if you add code between opening the file and exiting, it will execute. –  chris Jun 12 '12 at 3:45

You can stick a call to the Windows Sleep() function into the loop pretty easily. The argument is in milliseconds, so this will check the keyboard roughly five times a second:

#include <windows.h>
// ...
while (1){  
    if (GetKeyState('A'))
    {
        system("start love.mp3");
        return 0;
    }
    Sleep(200);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent! That works like I want it to. –  Thomas Jun 12 '12 at 3:26

Your program is guilty of busy-waiting.

Try hooking your keyboard calls by using SetWindowsHookEx.

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2  
Bit more complicated, but better overall. –  chris Jun 12 '12 at 3:27
    
@chris: Why do you consider this to be any more complicated than inserting a sleep? It's just one function that needs to be defined and set up. –  dirkgently Jun 12 '12 at 3:29
    
It's a bit more intimidating if you haven't used it before, especially if you use a version that injects the hook. –  chris Jun 12 '12 at 3:30
    
Actually, this should be a good exercise to get introduced to hooking on Windows. I've had some pretty tough time overriding all print shortcuts for a certain well-known application ;) –  dirkgently Jun 12 '12 at 3:37
    
Oh, definitely. When the time is on your hands, go crazy. Hooking is something you'll most likely use eventually, so it's better to be prepared. I myself had a fun time adding alt code functionality to a numpad that was a copy of the other numbers (and hence didn't work with alt codes). Also good for replacing that Win+R run window shortcut with your own run window when the run window is blocked for some reason. –  chris Jun 12 '12 at 3:41

The right way to do this would be to use a Windows hook, probably of type WH_KEYBOARD or WH_KEYBOARD_LL hook (although WH_GETMESSAGE would work as well) and do your processing there.

Look at the documentation for SetWindowsHookEx at http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/ms644990(v=vs.85).aspx

I haven't tested this - just whipped it up on the fly - but here's a simple example that should do what you want when the 'A' key is pressed.

LRESULT __stdcall CALLBACK LoveProc(int nCode, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
{
    static int love = 0;

    if((nCode == HC_ACTION) && 
       (wParam == 'A') &&      /* the key pressed was 'A' */
       (lParam & 0x40000000))  /* trigger when the key is pressed */
    {        
        if(love == 0)
            play_romantic_love_song();

        /* but don't overdo it because "Too Much Love Will Kill You" */
        love = 1;
    }

    return CallNextHookEx(hOldKeyHook, nCode, wParam, lParam );
}

You may also want to google for "*SetWindowsHookEx WH_KEYBOARD*" as I'm pretty sure there's at least a couple of articles that explain this on CodeProject. I'd include the links, but I'm typing this from my iPhone and it's being... difficult.

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Thanks for the answer. I have looked a bit at this. Would you be able to show an example of concrete code that I could start with? –  Thomas Jun 12 '12 at 14:22

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