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After updating my code based on answers to this previous question, I came up with the following solution:

var Coder = (function() {
    var controlWords = [
            ['ONE','OO'],
            ['TWO','TT'],
            ['THREE','RR'],
          //['...','..'],
            ['END','NN']
        ],
        map = {
            '0':' ', '1':'_', '2':',',
            '3':'.', '4':'?', '5':'!',
            '6':'\'','7':'"', '8':'(',
            '9':')', 'a':'o', 'b':'d',
            'c':'a', 'd':'e', 'e':'p',
            'f':'i', 'g':'f', 'h':'v',
            'i':'u', 'j':'l', 'k':'m',
            'l':'y', 'm':'q', 'n':'x',
            'o':'b', 'p':'j', 'q':'t',
            'r':'n', 's':'z', 't':'w',
            'u':'k', 'v':'h', 'w':'s',
            'x':'c', 'y':'r', 'z':'g'
        },
        reverseMap = (function() {
            var j, tmp = {};
            for (j in map){
                if (Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty.call(map, j))
                    tmp[map[j]] = j;
            }
            return tmp;
        })(),
        value, i,
        encode = function(data) {
            var input = (typeof data == 'string' ? data : '');
console.log('Input to encode: '+input);
            for (i = 0; i < controlWords.length; i++) {
                value = new RegExp(controlWords[i][0],'g');
                input = input.replace(value,controlWords[i][1]);
            }
console.log('Encode step 1: '+input);
            input = input.replace(/./g, function(c){
                return reverseMap[c]
                    || reverseMap[c.toLowerCase()].toUpperCase();
            });
console.log('Encoding output: '+input);
            return {length: input.length, data: input};
        },
        decode = function(data) {
            var input = (typeof data == 'string' ? data : '');
console.log('Input to decode: '+input);
            input = input.replace(/./g, function(c){
                return map[c]
                    || map[c.toLowerCase()].toUpperCase();
            });
console.log('Decode step 1: '+input);
            for (i = 0; i < controlWords.length; i++) {
                value = new RegExp(controlWords[i][1],'g');
                input = input.replace(value,controlWords[i][0]);
            }
console.log('Decoding output: '+input);
            return {length: input.length, data: input};
        };
    return {encode: encode, decode: decode};
})();
var str = 'ONE Hello, TWO JavaScript THREE World! END',
    enc = Coder.encode(str).data,
    dec = Coder.decode(enc).data;

As you can see, there's a lot of fully- or nearly-repeated code. The only meaningful differences are the order in which the two transformations happen, whether map or reverseMap is used, and which index of each control word array is used as the regex and which as the replacement value.

To abide by the concept of wrapping repeated code in a sub-function and calling that function, I made the following attempt. It defines the two transformations as internal functions, and then based on the value of the type argument, decides the rest.

var Coder = (function() {
    var controlWords = [ /* same */ ],
        map = { /* same */ },
        reverseMap = /* same */,
        code = function(data, type) {
            var input = (typeof data == 'string' ? data : ''),
                mapping, x, y, value, i,
                transform = function() {
                    return input.replace(/./g, function(c){
                        return mapping[c]
                            || mapping[c.toLowerCase()].toUpperCase();
                    });
                },
                replace = function() {
                    for (i = 0; i < controlWords.length; i++) {
                        value = new RegExp(controlWords[i][x],'g');
                        input = input.replace(value,controlWords[i][y]);
                    }
                    return input;
                };
            if (type == 'decode') {
                mapping = map;
                x = 1;
                y = 0;
                input = transform();
                input = replace();
            } else if (type == 'encode') {
                mapping = reverseMap;
                x = 0;
                y = 1;
                input = replace();
                input = transform();
            } else {
                throw new Error('Invalid type argument!');
            }
            return {data: input, length: input.length};
        };
    return {code: code};
})();
var str = 'ONE Hello, TWO JavaScript THREE World! END',
    enc = Coder.code(str, 'encode').data,
    dec = Coder.code(enc, 'decode').data;

However, you might notice that this code is actually longer. It's still more easily extended, if I wanted to add more types than 'encode' and 'decode' (not going to). But currently less efficient?

I then went back to the version with two functions (to avoid the passing of and check of 'type'):

var Coder = (function() {
    var controlWords = [ /* same */ ],
        map = { /* same */ },
        reverseMap = { /* same */ },
        input, mapping, x, y, value, i,
        transform = function() {
            return input.replace(/./g, function(c){
                return mapping[c]
                    || mapping[c.toLowerCase()].toUpperCase();
            });
        },
        replace = function() {
            for (i = 0; i < controlWords.length; i++) {
                value = new RegExp(controlWords[i][x],'g');
                input = input.replace(value,controlWords[i][y]);
            }
            return input;
        },
        encode = function(data) {
            input = (typeof data == 'string' ? data : '');
            mapping = reverseMap;
            x = 0;
            y = 1;
            input = replace();
            input = transform();
            return {length: input.length, data: input};
        },
        decode = function(data) {
            input = (typeof data == 'string' ? data : '');
            mapping = map;
            x = 1;
            y = 0;
            input = transform();
            input = replace();
            return {length: input.length, data: input};
        };
    return {encode: encode, decode: decode};
})();
// Call methods same as first example

So lengthy post to basically ask, which is better, repeated code or extra functions/checks, when it doesn't really help code length and there's no plans to extend the code or release it as a public project? Which of these is the most elegant solution, or is there an even better?

EDIT

One way I thought of to clean it up in general is to remove the variable declarations of mapping, x, and y and just pass them as arguments to replace and transform. This would yield

decode = function(data) {
    var input = (typeof data == 'string' ? data : '');
    input = transform(map);
    input = replace(1,0);
    return {length: input.length, data: input};
}
share|improve this question
    
If you have no plans of extending the code or letting anyone read it, why do you even care about its appearance? I like the way the last code chunk looks, personally, but if the situation is like you say it is, I wouldn't worry too much about it. – Blender Jun 12 '12 at 4:00
    
Two reasons: 1) Always develop good habits, never bad ones. 2) Readability is important, even in one's own projects. I know that I at least have returned to old projects to be a bit confused by what I was doing, even with comments. (oK, three reasons.) 3) It's possible one of those is slightly better performance-wise. – Marcus Hughes Jun 12 '12 at 4:08
    
@RobG: I'm not sure what made you think I'm expecting a certain order. Hmm. I'm not actually - I've seen the issue you mention brought up in quite a few forums. When I define 'reverseMap' based on 'map', it doesn't matter the order, just that the paired keys/values will remain consistent. Which they will. And then in the transform function, I'm simply looking up a value via a key, which doesn't care about order. – Marcus Hughes Jun 12 '12 at 4:34
    
And the problem with arrays is that I CAN'T look up a key easily. The only way to get the key/value pair setup like an object is to do nested arrays like in 'controlWords', or to rely on an "every other" approach in a normal array [x1, y1, x2, y2, ..., xn, yn]. Then you could look up the "value" of a "key" with arr[arr.indexOf(key)+1]. Ugly compared to obj[key]. A similar issue with arrays is that reverse wouldn't work with nested arrays either. It could work with the second version, but back to the ugly issue. – Marcus Hughes Jun 12 '12 at 4:34

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