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Do we have some opensource alternatives to IBM pureQuery to query in-memory collections of the Java Collection Framework, or composite Java objects?

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I'm not sure whether you're asking if there's an OSS alternative to pureQuery and whether pureQuery works on in-memory DS of the Java Collection Framework, of if you want an OSS aternative that does work on in-memory collections, including specifically the Java Collections Framework. –  haylem Jun 12 '12 at 4:52
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2 Answers

As mentioned in my comment, I am not entirely sure I understand your question: I'm not sure whether you're asking if there's an OSS alternative to pureQuery and whether pureQuery works on in-memory DS of the Java Collection Framework, of if you want an OSS aternative that does work on in-memory collections, including specifically the Java Collections Framework.

But, I'll git it a try...

Persistence-Layer Query Languages / Frameworks

If you're looking for an open source software for query-base interaction with a persistence layer, the obvious solutions are quite simply:

Note that these could be used on an in-memory database as well (like H2 or HSQLDb).

Collections Query Languages / Frameworks

However, if you want to query collections, there are a few projects, like:

  • the java Query Language (JQL) language extension:

    ArrayList<String> words = dict.getWords(Puzzle.MEDIUM);
    ArrayList<Integer> gaplengths = puzzle.getGapLengths();
    
    List<Object[]> matches = selectAll(
        String w : words, 
        Integer i : gaplengths | w.length() == i);
    
  • the Stack-Based Query Language for Java (sqbl4j) language extension:

    List<Product> products = getProductList();
    List<Product> expensiveInStockProducts = #{
        products 
        where unitsInStock > 0 and unitPrice > 3.00
    };
    
  • Java Objects SQL (JoSQL):

    List myObjs = getMyObjects ();
    Query q = new Query ();
    q.parse ("SELECT * FROM java.io.File WHERE name LIKE '%.java'");
    QueryResults qr = q.execute (myObjs);
    List res = qr.getResults ();
    
  • jxpath, for a different approach with XPath expressions:

    Address address = (Address)JXPathContext
        .newContext(vendor)
        .getValue("locations[address/zipCode='90210']/address");
    
  • Functional programming libraries for Java provide similar features, in that they give you access to the basic functional constructs filter, map, collect, transform etc... For instance, with:

    • Google Guava:

      Set<String> strings = buildSetStrings();  
      Collection<String> filteredStrings =
          Collections2.filter(strings, Predicates.containsPattern("^J"));  
      
    • Functional Java:

      Array<Integer> a = array(97, 44, 67, 3, 22, 90, 1, 77, 98, 1078, 6, 64, 6, 79, 42);
      final Array<Integer> b = a.filter(even);
      
    • LambdaJ:

      // with normal interfaces:
      List<Person> buyersSortedByAges = sort(
          extract(
              select(sales, having(on(Sale.class).getValue(), greaterThan(50000)))
          ), on(Sale.class).getBuyer() 
      ), on(Person.class).getAge());
      
      // with fluent/chainable intefaces:
      List<Person> buyersSortedByAges = with(sales)
          .retain(having(on(Sale.class).getValue(), greaterThan(50000)))
          .extract(on(Sale.class).getBuyer())
          .sort(on(Person.class).getAge());
      

Or maybe you were just looking for this tutorial on querying in-memory collections with pureQuery?

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Also CQEngine, which supports indexing as well as querying: CQEngine.

For more background see similar question: How do you query object collections in Java (Criteria/SQL-like)?

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