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So I wrote this function that is given possible numbers, and it has to find the two numbers inside the possible numbers that make up the given number. However, I am still learning Python (a very wonderful language) so I can only use a limited set of functions.

I created this function:

def sumPair(theList, n):

    theList = charCount(theList) #charCount is a function i made to convert the list into a dictionary
    for i in theList:
        for a,b in theList.iteritems():
            print a,b
            if a + i == n:
                if theList[b] > 1:
                    return [i, b]
                if a != i:
                    return [i, b]
        return "[]"
print sumPair([6,3,6,8,3,2,8,3,2], 11)   

Like I said, it finds the two numbers that add up to the given number. charCount is a function I wrote that adds the array into a dictionary.

In this program, I make sure that the value is bigger then one in case the numbers that are being added are the same. Sometimes if it checks for the sum of 10 and you give it a number of 5, it will just add the 5 to itself and return 10. That's why the if theList[b] > 1: is there.

Why am I here? My instructor wasn't happy with two loops. I spent 5 hours troubleshooting and got nowhere. I need to convert this program into a single loop program.

I spent all day on this, I'm not trying to make you do my homework, I'm just really stuck and I need your help. I've heard I'm supposed to check if a key exists to get this done.

share|improve this question
1  
Why do you need to convert it into a dictionary first? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 12 '12 at 6:09
1  
Will the numbers always be next to each other? In the list you show, an answer would be (8, 3) because those add to 11. Will a correct answer always have the numbers next to each other, or could the numbers be any two numbers in the list? –  steveha Jun 12 '12 at 6:10
1  
... why did you have to "hide" the code in the question? –  weronika Jun 12 '12 at 16:04
    
well the question was solved, and i dont want my teacher to do no site:stackoverflow.com "sumpair[6,3,6,8,3,8,3,2]" –  Web Master Jun 12 '12 at 18:47
    
OMFG "not quite, "if x in theList:" actually does a loop over theList in the backend, so it's still a loop. Dont search for it in the list, search for it in the dictionary" –  Web Master Jun 12 '12 at 20:10

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It always helps to think about the problem in terms how would I do it by hand, with pencil and paper or even only looking at the row of the numbers on the paper. However, the better solutions may look overcomplicated at first, and their advantage may not be that clear at first look -- see gnibbler's solution (his answer is my personal winner, see below).

First of all, you need to compare one number against all of the rest. Then second number with the rest, etc. When using the naive approach, there is no way to avoid two nested loops when using a single procesor. Then the time complexity is always O(n^2) where n is the length of the sequence. The truth is that some of the loops may be hidden in the operations like in or list.index() which does not make the solution better in principle.

Imagine the cartesian product of the numbers -- it consists of couples of the numbers. There is n^2 of such couples, but about a half is the same with respect to the comutative nature of the addition operation, and n of them are the pairs with itsef. It means that you need to check only n^2 / 2 - n pairs. It is much better to avoid looping through the unneccessary pairs than to test later if they fit for the testing:

for each first element in theList:
    for each second element in the rest of theList from the checked one on:
        if the first and the second elements give the solution:
            report the result
            possibly early break if only the first should be reported

Use slicing for the rest of theList from the checked one on, use the enumerate() in the first (and possibly also in the second) loop to know the index.

It is always good idea to minimize operations in the loops. Think about the inner loop body is done the most times. This way you can compute the searched number before entering the inner loop: searched = sum - first. Then the second loop plus the if can be replaced by if searched in the rest of theList:

[Edited after more full solutions appeared here]

Here is the O(n^2) solution to find the first occurence or None (pure Python, simple, no libraires, built-in functions and slicing only, few lines):

def sumPair(theList, n):
    for index, e in enumerate(theList):     # to know the index for the slicing below
        complement = n - e                  # we are searching for the complement
        if complement in theList[index+1:]: # only the rest is searched
            return e, complement            

print sumPair([6,3,6,8,3,2,8,3,2], 11)

[added after gnibbler's comment on slicing and copying]

gnibbler is right about slicing. The slice is the copy. (The question is whether slicing is not optimized using "copy on write" technique -- I do not know. If yes, then slicing would be a cheap operation for the purpose.) To avoid copying, the test can be done using the list.index() method that allows to pass the starting index. The only strange thing is that it raises the ValueError exception when the item is not found. This way the if complement... must be replaced by the try ... except:

def sumPair2(theList, n):
    for ind, e in enumerate(theList):
        try:
            theList.index(n - e, ind + 1)
            return e, n - e
        except ValueError:
            pass

Gnibbler's comment made me thinking more about the problem. The truth is that the set can be close to O(1) to test whether it contains the element and O(n) to construct the set. It is not that clear for non-numeric elements (where the set type cannot be implemented as a bit array). When hash arrays comes to the play and possible conflicts should be solved using other techniques, then the quality depends on the implementation.

When in doubt, measure. Here the gnibbler's solution was slightly modified to be as same as the other solutions:

import timeit

def sumPair(theList, n):
    for index, e in enumerate(theList):
        if n - e in theList[index+1:]:
            return e, n - e

def sumPair2(theList, n):
    for ind, e in enumerate(theList):
        try:
            theList.index(n - e, ind + 1)
            return e, n - e
        except ValueError:
            pass

def sumPair_gnibbler(theList, n):
    # If n is even, check whether n/2 occurs twice or more in theList
    if n%2 == 0 and theList.count(n/2) > 1:
        return n/2, n/2

    theSet = set(theList)
    for e in theSet:
        if n - e in theSet:
            return e, n - e

The original numbers from the question were used for the first time test. The n = 1 causes the worst case when the solution cannot be found:

theList = [6,3,6,8,3,2,8,3,2]

n = 11
print '---------------------', n
print sumPair(theList, n), 
print timeit.timeit('sumPair(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair, theList, n', number = 1000)

print sumPair2(theList, n), 
print timeit.timeit('sumPair2(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair2, theList, n', number = 1000)

print sumPair_gnibbler(theList, n),
print timeit.timeit('sumPair_gnibbler(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair_gnibbler, theList, n', number = 1000)

n = 1
print '---------------------', n
print sumPair(theList, n), 
print timeit.timeit('sumPair(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair, theList, n', number = 1000)

print sumPair2(theList, n), 
print timeit.timeit('sumPair2(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair2, theList, n', number = 1000)

print sumPair_gnibbler(theList, n),
print timeit.timeit('sumPair_gnibbler(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair_gnibbler, theList, n', number = 1000)

It produces the following output on my console:

--------------------- 11
(3, 8) 0.00180958639191
(3, 8) 0.00594907526295
(8, 3) 0.00124991060067
--------------------- 1
None 0.00502748219333
None 0.026334041968
None 0.00150958864789

It is impossible to say anything about the quality in the sense of the time complexity from that short sequence of numbers and one special case. Anyway, gnibbler's solution won.

The gnibbler's solution uses the most memory in cases when the sequence contains unique values. Let's try much longer sequence containing 0, 1, 2, ..., 9999. The n equal to 11 and 3000 represents the task with a solution. For the case with n equal to 30000, the couple of numbers cannot be found. All elements must be checked -- worst case:

theList = range(10000)

n = 11
print '---------------------', n
print sumPair(theList, n), 
print timeit.timeit('sumPair(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair, theList, n', number = 100)

print sumPair2(theList, n), 
print timeit.timeit('sumPair2(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair2, theList, n', number = 100)

print sumPair_gnibbler(theList, n),
print timeit.timeit('sumPair_gnibbler(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair_gnibbler, theList, n', number = 100)

n = 3000
print '---------------------', n
print sumPair(theList, n), 
print timeit.timeit('sumPair(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair, theList, n', number = 100)

print sumPair2(theList, n), 
print timeit.timeit('sumPair2(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair2, theList, n', number = 100)

print sumPair_gnibbler(theList, n),
print timeit.timeit('sumPair_gnibbler(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair_gnibbler, theList, n', number = 100)

n = 30000
print '---------------------', n
print sumPair(theList, n), 
print timeit.timeit('sumPair(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair, theList, n', number = 100)

print sumPair2(theList, n), 
print timeit.timeit('sumPair2(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair2, theList, n', number = 100)

print sumPair_gnibbler(theList, n),
print timeit.timeit('sumPair_gnibbler(theList, n)', 'from __main__ import sumPair_gnibbler, theList, n', number = 100)

Notice that the sequence is much longer. The test is repeated only 100 times to get the results in reasonable time. (The time cannot be compared with the previous test unless you divide it by the number.) It displays the following on my console:

--------------------- 11
(0, 11) 0.00840137682165
(0, 11) 0.00015695881967
(0, 11) 0.089894683992
--------------------- 3000
(0, 3000) 0.0166750746034
(0, 3000) 0.00966040735374
(0, 3000) 0.12532849753
--------------------- 30000
None 180.328006493
None 163.651082944
None 0.204691100723

Here the gnibbler's solution seems to be slow for the non-worst case. The reason is that it needs the preparation phase that goes through all the sequence. The naive solutions found the numbers in about one third of the first pass. What tells anythig is the worst case. The gnibbler's solution is about 1000 times faster, and the difference would increase for longer sequences. Gnibbler's solution is the clear winner.

share|improve this answer
    
dude you are really awesome. thank you. –  Web Master Jun 12 '12 at 10:22
    
@Web Master: It is always better for you when you find the solution on your own. I hope you have spent enought time to understand this solution in details. But you should be aware of the fact that there are still two loops, even though the inner loop does not look like. Anyway, sjr is right that there is a solution with better time complexity. However, it is not that simple-looking. –  pepr Jun 12 '12 at 10:37
    
My answer is O(n). theList[index+1:] creates a copy each time, so is going to be pretty slow –  gnibbler Jun 12 '12 at 11:03
    
list.index is O(n) and since you have it inside a loop, this algorithm is O(n*n) –  gnibbler Jun 13 '12 at 0:43
1  
this analysis is hilariously flawed :) –  sjr Jun 13 '12 at 18:46

Instructor is probably unhappy that your algorithm takes longer than it has to. Try this:

for each element x in theList
  if there exists an element y in theList such that x+y = n, you have a match

You need to make the "if exists" test fast, which is what you use a dictionary for. One loop will build up this dictionary, the second will search through. This will take linear time versus your O(n^2) time.

Your point about 5 matching with itself is a good one. You want to use a data structure called a multiset or bag. Read about it then implement your code this way:

for each element x in theList
  if there exists an element y in theList such that x+y == n:
    if x != y or (x == y and x occurs more than once):
      you have a match

Good luck.

EDIT Because there are so many suboptimal solutions, here is the simple, linear solution (it's linear because there are 2 loops through the list, but the loops come one after the other. So, 2*n iterations, O(n). It is very fast.

#!/usr/bin/python2.6

from collections import defaultdict

def sum_list(l, n):
  count = defaultdict(lambda: 0)

  for x in l:      # O(n)
    count[x] += 1  # This can be done in constant time O(1)

  for x in l:      # O(n)
    y = n - x
    if count[y] > 0 and (x != y or count[y] > 1): # O(1)
      return x, y
share|improve this answer
1  
I'm just guessing, but probably the instructor in a basic Python class is not looking for a multiset or bag answer. –  steveha Jun 12 '12 at 6:14
    
However you end up implementing it, you will end up with the equivalent data structure to a multiset or bag. This can be a dictionary of element -> count. –  sjr Jun 12 '12 at 6:16
    
the second code written here. is that a concept or actual code? haha –  Web Master Jun 12 '12 at 6:32
    
I think your algorithm is O(n^2) which is unnecessarily long. It's not just python programmers, any CS major will look at it and say ew! :) –  sjr Jun 12 '12 at 6:32
    
This is a linear solution. The fast solution is not at all sophisticated and doesn't require any tricks. –  sjr Jun 12 '12 at 7:16

You could check for the special case separately. n%2 means "n mod 2" so it is 0 when n is even

def sumPair(theList, n):
    # If n is even, check whether n/2 occurs twice or more in theList
    if n%2 == 0 and theList.count(n/2) > 1:
        return [n/2, n/2]

    theSet = set(theList)
    for i in theSet:
        if n-i in theSet:
            return [i, n-i]
    return []
share|improve this answer
    
It may depend on what do you consider an atomic operation. In my opinion, even the set(theList) is worse than O(n). (You know it depends on the implementation of the set.) This way the whole alogrithm does not have the O(n) complexity. –  pepr Jun 12 '12 at 20:09
1  
@pepr, set(theList) is amortized O(n). The whole algorithm is O(n). –  gnibbler Jun 13 '12 at 0:41
    
You are right. My +1. I have also rewritten my answer to reflect your solution. ;) –  pepr Jun 13 '12 at 9:08

My comments:

  • If you convert a list into a dictionary, change the name from theList to some other name. It is confusing to have a variable called theList that holds a dictionary.

  • If the two numbers will always be found next to each other, you could try writing a loop that sets an index variable i to 0, and then increments i, checking to see whether theList[i] + theList[i + 1] is equal to the desired number.

  • If the two numbers might not be found next to each other, then it is trickier. The most obvious way would be to use two loops: one to look at each number in turn, and one to look at following numbers to see if they sum to the target. If the two numbers don't have to be next to each other, and the instructor wants you to use only one loop, then either you will need to use something to hold the list values (like a dictionary) or possibly use an "implicit loop".

What do I mean by "implicit loop"? Python offers an operator, in, that will tell you if an object is in a Python list. This works by looping through the list, but you don't write the loop; the loop is done for you inside of Python.

So, you could do it like so: look at each number in turn. Subtract the number from the target value, and then use in to see if the computed value is in the rest of the list. To search the rest of the list, and skip past the current value, use "list slicing". If you haven't learned slicing yet, your instructor probably isn't looking for a list slicing answer.

Here is an example. If you have i set to 0, and you are looking at the first entry in the list, the value is 6. The target value is 11. So the computed value is (11 - 6) or 5. Then you would check to see if computed_value in theList. To look only at the rest of the list, you could use slicing, and you would then have computed_value in theList[1:]. If you had an index variable i, you would have something like computed_value = 11 - theList[i] and then check to see if computed_value in theList[i:].

  • Don't forget that it is possible to use a for loop to make an index that goes from 0 to the length of the list, and index into the list using the index. In Python it is usually best to use for x in lst: which sets x to successive objects from the list, but sometimes you have a problem where it is useful to use for i in xrange(len(lst)): and then use lst[i] or lst[i+1] or lst[i:] or whatever.

  • Use whatever coding style your teacher wants. If your teacher wants "camelCase" names like "theList", do that. But the usual style for Python is called "PEP 8" and variable names in that style are lower-case with underscores, like "the_list". http://www.python.org/dev/peps/pep-0008/

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think the code style should be up to the teacher as long as it's clean and consistent. If he doesn't like the PEP-8 one and you use it you can always point him to PEP-8. –  ThiefMaster Jun 12 '12 at 6:29
    
sorry was lazy on the naming. that could give an index out of range error okay ty for your comments, ill take more time to read it more thoroughly –  Web Master Jun 12 '12 at 6:30
    
I don't recommend picking fights with instructors over things like coding conventions. If you work at a company you need to use the coding convention in use at that company, and a class is kind of the same thing. Plus, pick your battles; don't argue with the teacher over small things. –  steveha Jun 12 '12 at 6:35
    
haha, im not arguing with anyone at all. the dude just told me to use a single loop –  Web Master Jun 12 '12 at 10:16

pure python - no libraries used:

def combinations(lst):
    l = lst[:] # copy of source list
    while len(l) > 1:
        a = l.pop(0)
        for b in l:
           yield a,b

def first_pair(iterator):
    for i in iterator:
       # just return first element
       return i

def sum_pair(lst, sum_val):
    return first_pair((a,b) for a,b in combinations(lst) if (a+b) == sum_val)

print sum_pair([6,3,6,8,3,2,8,3,2], 11)
# result (3,8)

with itertools:

from itertools import combinations, islice

def sum_pair(lst, sum_val):
    return list(islice(((a,b)
        for a,b in combinations(lst, 2) if (a+b) == sum_val), 0, 1))

print sum_pair([6,3,6,8,3,2,8,3,2], 11)
# result [(3,8)]
share|improve this answer
    
I think both these are O(n^2) and unnecessarily complicated –  sjr Jun 12 '12 at 6:40
    
@sjr, both implementations of combinations are lazy - it's quite effective. combinations returns successive r-length combinations of elements in the source list. –  astynax Jun 12 '12 at 6:56
    
How does being lazy help? You don't short-circuit the operation so you'll end up "lazily" evaluating everything, right? –  sjr Jun 12 '12 at 6:57
    
@sjr, combinations returns lazy iterator, filtering gen.expression are lazy, first_pair/islice stops after first result! –  astynax Jun 12 '12 at 7:01
    
If there are no matches? –  sjr Jun 12 '12 at 7:03

This is a very good question, I was once asked for a way to do it in linear time with constant space, to this day I don't know how to achieve this.

This is a simple implementation, Im sure theres a way to make it a bit faster using caching but thats assuming that every integer in the list isn't unique, if it is I don't think caching is going to help ...

def get_sum_pairs(sum = None, list_of_numbers = None):
    assert sum != None and list_of_numbers != None
    list_of_numbers = sorted(list_of_numbers) # sort the list of numbers O(n log n)        
    for index, number in enumerate(list_of_numbers): # search for each number that is less than the sum O(n)
        if number < sum: # if number greater then sum, theres nothing we can do.
            for index, number_1 in enumerate(list_of_numbers[(index + 1):]): # search the second list, this isn't exactly O(n) since its incremented being incremented
                if number + number_1 == sum: # found a solution.
                    return [(number, number_1)]
                if (number_1 > sum) or (number + number_1 > sum): # if number greater then sum, theres nothing we can do.
                    break                                       # if the addition of two sorted numbers is greater then sum, then theres no need to keep searching since the rest will also be greater, since their sorted.
        else:
            break
    return [()]

the only either way is to use some kind of math formula or trick which unfortunately I don't have.

When measuring running times we, for the most part consider, the worst case scenarion, in this case it would be a list of numbers where each number would be less than the sum as well as being unique.

So theres n unique numbers all less than the sum, by sorting we can reduce the number of checks since we only need to move forward since 1 + 2 == 2 + 1 :) but we still need to check 2 + 3, 3 + 4 and so on ... but also note that if the checked sum is greater then giving sum we can also stop since the sums will be increasing ... :)

here are some tests ...

assert all([get_sum_pairs(**test[0]) == test[1] for test in
     [({'list_of_numbers':[6,3,6,8,3,2,8,3,2], 'sum':11}, [(3, 8)]),
     ({'list_of_numbers':[1,2,3,4,1,2], 'sum':1}, [()]),
     ({'list_of_numbers':[1,2,3,1,23,1,23,123], 'sum':124}, [(1, 123)]),
     ({'list_of_numbers':[1,2,3,12,3,2,1,23,4,1,23,4,5,12332], 'sum':14}, [(2, 12)]),
     ({'list_of_numbers':[-1,2,-2, -3, 1, 2, 3, 2, -1.3], 'sum':1}, [(-1, 2)])
     ] ])
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for the help –  Web Master Jun 12 '12 at 10:23
    
linear time and constant space is easy enough if you have fixed upper and lower bounds for the numbers in the list –  gnibbler Jun 12 '12 at 10:59

I'm not sure about @samy.vilar's 'constant space', but here's a solution that is linear time and space (proportional to n though rather than to len(numbers)):

def sumpairs(numbers, n):
    numbers = [None] + numbers + [None] * (n-len(numbers))
    for k in range(len(numbers)):
        a = numbers[k]
        if a is None or a==k: continue
        if numbers[n-a]==n-a:
            return a, n-a
        numbers[k] = None
        while numbers[a] != a and a is not None:
            b = n-a
            if numbers[a] is None:
                numbers[a] = a
                break
            if numbers[b]==b:
                return a, n-a
            numbers[a], a = a, numbers[a]

print(sumpairs([6,3,6,8,3,2,8,3,2], 16))
print(sumpairs([6,3,6,8,3,2,8,3,2], 11))
print(sumpairs([6,3,5,8,3,2,8,3,2], 10))
print(sumpairs([6,3,5,8,3,2,8,3,2], 5))
print(sumpairs([6,3,5,8,3,2,8,3,2], 12)) # This should fail.

It works by moving each number into its corresponding position in the list (I added a leading None to get 1 based indices). The complexity is slightly tricky: there is a nested loop, but since each number gets its position changed at most once the entire process is still O(n).

That solution is of course terrible when n is large compared with the length of the number list. Here's a solution that is constant space (if you destroy the input, otherwise you need a single copy of it) and O(n log n) time for n being the length of the input:

def sumpairs(numbers, n):
    numbers = sorted(numbers)
    low = 0
    while low < len(numbers)-1:
        t = numbers[low] + numbers[-1]
        if t > n:
            numbers.pop(-1)
        elif t < n:
            low += 1
        else:
            return numbers[low], numbers[-1]

print(sumpairs([6,3,6,8,3,2,8,3,2], 16))
print(sumpairs([6,3,6,8,3,2,8,3,2], 11))
print(sumpairs([6,3,5,8,3,2,8,3,2], 10))
print(sumpairs([6,3,5,8,3,2,8,3,2], 5))
print(sumpairs([6,3,5,8,3,2,8,3,2], 12)) # This should fail.
share|improve this answer
    
dude your over thinking it, but thank you for valiant effort. –  Web Master Jun 12 '12 at 10:23
    
Just pointing out some slightly different solutions that hadn't already been suggested. –  Duncan Jun 12 '12 at 11:37

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