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I have these tables

places(place_id, place_name)
places_criteria(place_id, criterion_id)
criteria(criterion_id, criterion_name)

"places_criteria" have foreign keys to "places" and "criteria". I can get many places by one criterion.

SELECT p.place_id, p.place_name
FROM places p INNER JOIN places_criteria pc ON p.place_id = pc.place_id
WHERE pc.criterion_id = < some_id >

How to get many places by multiple criteria?

For example: Disneyland is a place (place_id = 1), it is "good" (criterion_id = 1) and "interesting" (criterion_id = 2).

places_criteria's data:

place_id   criterion_id
1            1
1            2

Now I want to get the places which are "good" AND "interesting".

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1  
I think your description of the problem lacks some clarity. Can you give an example of data in those tables, and an example of the result you'd like? –  GolezTrol Jun 12 '12 at 6:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The hard coded version is to join the table on itself for each criterion you need...

SELECT
  c1.place_id
FROM
  places_criteria      AS c1
INNER JOIN
  places_criteria      AS c2
    ON c2.place_id = c1.place_id
WHERE
      c1.criterion_id = 1
  AND c2.criterion_id = 2

That is efficient, but requires dynamic SQL if you want to query a dynamic number of criterion_ids.

The alternative is to use IN (1,2) (or a join, etc, to perform a similar function) to get the answer to Places with criterion 1 <OR> 2, then using a HAVING clause to include only places with two different criterion.

SELECT
  place_id
FROM
  places_criteria
WHERE
  criterion_id IN (1,2)
GROUP BY
  place_id
HAVING
  COUNT(DISTINCT criterion_id) = 2
share|improve this answer

You can do this :

SELECT p.place_id, p.place_name
FROM places p, places_criteria pc1, places_criteria pc2, places_criteria pc3
WHERE p.place_id = pc2.place_id and pc1.criterion_id = < some_id >
and  p.place_id = pc2.place_id and pc2.criterion_id = < some_id >
and p.place_id = pc3.place_id and pc3.criterion_id = < some_id >

But I have a doubt regarding my understanding of your question : why do you show us the criteria table ?

share|improve this answer
    
This won't allow for easy growth of the query when you want multiple conditions, so this solution is overly complex and very inflexible. –  GolezTrol Jun 12 '12 at 6:42
2  
Queries like this are built in a program, the same that offers the ability to enter multiple criteria. That's why that's the common way to do it. –  dystroy Jun 12 '12 at 6:50

If you want all the places that meet one of several criteria:

SELECT p.place_id, p.place_name
FROM places p
INNER JOIN places_criteria pc ON p.place_id = pc.place_id
WHERE pc.criterion_id = < some_id >
OR pc.criterion_id = < some_id2 >
OR pc.criterion_id = < some_id3 >
GROUP BY p.place_id, p.place_name

If you want all the places that meet all of several criteria:

SELECT p.place_id, p.place_name
FROM places p
INNER JOIN places_criteria pc1 ON p.place_id = pc1.place_id
INNER JOIN places_criteria pc2 ON p.place_id = pc2.place_id
INNER JOIN places_criteria pc3 ON p.place_id = pc3.place_id
WHERE pc1.criterion_id = < some_id >
AND pc2.criterion_id = < some_id2 >
AND pc3.criterion_id = < some_id3 >
share|improve this answer
    
The latter works for my need but how's about the performance? –  Emerald214 Jun 12 '12 at 6:56
    
@Emerald214 As far as I know, it's the best way to do this kind of search. Perhaps somebody else knows a faster way. –  Pablo Jun 12 '12 at 7:00

Use in to select from a set. You can use a subselect to get the right place ids, or you can use distinct as I do, which is probably somewhat faster in MySQL.

select distinct
  p.place_id,
  p.place
from
  places p
  inner join places_criteria pc on pc.place_id = p.place_id
  inner join criteria c on c.criterion_id = pc.criterion_id
where
  /* Either by name */
  c.criterion_name in ('crit A', 'crit B', 'crit C')
  /* Or by id */
  OR c.criterion_id in (1, 2, 3, 4, 5)

Solution 2. Match all criteria. Do this, by checking the count.

select
  p.place_id,
  p.place
from
  places p
  inner join places_criteria pc on pc.place_id = p.place_id
  inner join criteria c on c.criterion_id = pc.criterion_id
where
  c.criterion_name in ('crit A', 'crit B', 'crit C')
group by 
  p.place_id,
  p.place
having
  count(*) = 3 /* the number of criteria */
share|improve this answer
1  
hi, but "IN" means "OR" condition. I want to get all places which are "good" AND "interesting". Could you give the other answer? –  Emerald214 Jun 12 '12 at 6:50
    
As you wish. See edit. You still have some flexibility. You only need to specify a list of criteria and the number of criteria you specified, without adding additional joins. –  GolezTrol Jun 12 '12 at 7:34

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