Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Given a hash

z = [{'a' => 1, 'b' => 2}, {'a' => 3, 'b' => 4}, {'a' => 1, 'b' => 4}]

How do I search if the search parameter itself is a hash e.g.

{'a' => 3}

so that I can do something like z.find_by_hash({'a' => 3}) for it to return

{'a' => 3, 'b' => 4}

and also to get a collection of arrays like z.find_by_hash({'a' => 1}) for it to return

[{'a' => 1, 'b' => 2}, {'a' => 1, 'b => 4}]

Thanks

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can do this:

class Array
  def find_by_hash(hash)
    self.select { |h| h.includes_hash?(hash) }
  end
end

class Hash
  def includes_hash?(other)
    included = true

    other.each do |key, value|
      included &= self[key] == other[key]
    end

    included
  end
end

This extends Hash by a method to find out if a Hash includes another (with multiple keys and values). Array is extended with the method you wanted, but it's a more generic approach since you can do this:

ary = [ {:a => 1, :b => 3, :c => 5}, {:a => 5, :b => 2, :c => 8} ]
ary.find_by_hash( { :a => 1, :c => 5 } )

Note: You should also consider using Symbols for Hash keys since it is a common practice in Ruby, but my approach does also work with your keys.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This is correct, as it addresses the underlying problem of searching for a hash within a hash –  globetrotter Jun 12 '12 at 7:43
z = [{'a' => 1, 'b' => 2}, {'a' => 3, 'b' => 4}, {'a' => 1, 'b' => 4}]

class Array
  def search_hash(hash)
    key = hash.keys.first
    value = hash.values.first
    select { |h| h[key] == value }
  end
end

z.search_hash({'a' => 3}) #=> [{"a"=>3, "b"=>4}]

or you can type it without curly brackets

z.search_hash('a' => 3)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I implemented it like this, but I was wondering if there is a more generic solution –  globetrotter Jun 12 '12 at 7:42

Basically what you need is something like this:

class Array
  def find_by_hash(h)
    h.collect_concat  do |key, value| 
      self.select{|h| h[key] == value}
    end
  end 
end
share|improve this answer
    
I don't see this collect_concat method in either Ruby 1.8.7 or in Ruby 1.9.3 –  globetrotter Jun 12 '12 at 7:20
    
Check out the documentation for the Enumerable mixin ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Enumerable.html#method-i-collect_concat –  Hugo Jun 12 '12 at 7:22

I didn't find an approach in API, so I think we have to implement it of our own.
(by the way, I think @megas' approach is better and more readable)

Code by TDD:

class SearchHashTest < Test::Unit::TestCase
  def setup
    @array_with_hash_elements = ArrayWithHashElements.new [{'a' => 1, 'b' => 2}, {'a' => 3, 'b' => 4}, {'a' => 1, 'b' => 4}]
  end
  def test_search_an_array_by_hash_parameter_and_return_single_hash
    assert_equal( {'a' => 3, 'b' => 4}, @array_with_hash_elements.search({'a'=>3}) )
  end
  def test_search_an_array_by_hash_parameter_and_return_an_array
    assert_equal( [{'a' => 1, 'b' => 2}, {'a'=> 1, 'b' => 4}], @array_with_hash_elements.search({'a'=>1}))
  end
end

implemented code ( just for demo, not production)

class ArrayWithHashElements
  def initialize some_array
    @elements = some_array
  end
  def search( query_hash)
    puts "search:  #{query_hash.inspect}"
    result = []
    @elements.each do | array_element_in_hash_form|
      query_hash.each_pair do | key, value |
        if array_element_in_hash_form.has_key?(key) && array_element_in_hash_form[key] == value
          puts "adding : #{array_element_in_hash_form.inspect} to result"
          result << array_element_in_hash_form
        end
      end
      result
    end
    return result.size != 1 ? result : result[0]
  end
end

result:

sg552@siwei-moto:~/workspace/test$ ruby search_hash_test.rb
Loaded suite search_hash_test
Started
search:  {"a"=>1}
adding : {"b"=>2, "a"=>1} to result
adding : {"b"=>4, "a"=>1} to result
.search:  {"a"=>3}
adding : {"b"=>4, "a"=>3} to result
.
Finished in 0.000513 seconds.

2 tests, 2 assertions, 0 failures, 0 errors
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.