Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can anyone explain the following PHP Code ?

function get_param($param_name, $param_type = 0)
    {
      global $HTTP_POST_VARS, $HTTP_GET_VARS;

      $param_value = "";
    	if (isset($_POST)) {
    	  if (isset($_POST[$param_name]) && $param_type != GET)
      	  $param_value = $_POST[$param_name];
    	  elseif (isset($_GET[$param_name]) && $param_type != POST)
      	  $param_value = $_GET[$param_name];
    	} else {
    	  if (isset($HTTP_POST_VARS[$param_name]) && $param_type != GET)
      	  $param_value = $HTTP_POST_VARS[$param_name];
    	  elseif (isset($HTTP_GET_VARS[$param_name]) && $param_type != POST)
      	  $param_value = $HTTP_GET_VARS[$param_name];
    	}

    	return strip($param_value);
    }

function strip($value)
    {
    	if (get_magic_quotes_gpc() == 0) {
        	return $value;
    	} else {
    		return stripslashes($value);
    	}
    }


UPDATE

It is used like this:

$xml = get_param('xml');
share|improve this question
1  
What specifically do you have a problem with? –  Daniel A. White Jul 8 '09 at 16:45
    
I want to know what the above function does ? –  Ibn Saeed Jul 8 '09 at 16:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The code gets the value from the get and post data arrays. It also strips slashes on php installations that have magic quotes enabled. It looks like the function is made for backwards compatibility with older version of PHP. I wouldn't use this unless you are required to support older versions of PHP.

You don't need to make any changes for this to work in PHP 5, however I would just do the following: For Get data:

if(isset($_GET['param_name'])){
    // What ever you want to do with the value
}

For Post data:

if(isset($_POST['param_name'])){
    // What ever you want to do with the value
}

You should also read up on Magic Quotes since it was not deprecated till PHP 5.3.0 and you may need to be concerned about it.

The updated function could also be written as:

function get_param($param_name, $param_type = 0)
{

  $param_value = "";
  if (isset($_POST[$param_name]) && $param_type != GET){
      $param_value = $_POST[$param_name];
  }
  elseif (isset($_GET[$param_name]) && $param_type != POST){
      $param_value = $_GET[$param_name];
  }
  return strip($param_value);
}

Strip can be left alone.

share|improve this answer
    
If I want change it for PHP 5.1+ , what changes do I have to make ? –  Ibn Saeed Jul 8 '09 at 16:49
    
You shouldn't need to change anything for PHP 5.1+. –  ceejayoz Jul 8 '09 at 16:51
    
Sorry, i wanted to know how to remove the backwards compatibility from 5.1 and below –  Ibn Saeed Jul 8 '09 at 16:58
    
Added an updated function, the references to $HTTP_*_VARS were removed. –  MitMaro Jul 8 '09 at 17:07
    
Thanks for the updated code. –  Ibn Saeed Jul 8 '09 at 17:15
function get_param($param_name, $param_type = 0)

This returns a parameter value, with a given type, POST, or GET, which is optional. The value is stripped of slashes.

function strip($value)

This returns the parameter without slashes.

I agree with the other comments that this code was written prior to 2003, and should not be used, unless for supporting old code.

share|improve this answer
1  
You might want to add that the given type is optional. –  Spencer Ruport Jul 8 '09 at 16:48

Looks like some insane way of making sure you're getting the correct GET/POST vars. Most of the code from get_param() seems to be a way to make the code work on almost any php version, since it's using the legacy methods, you should have a look at the PHP Manual about _GET/_POST

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the "insane". –  Sander Marechal Jul 8 '09 at 16:50

The code is a function that takes a parameter's name ($param_name) and the HTTP request type it's expected to be found in (GET or POST), then looks through the current ($_GET and $_POST) and deprecated ($HTTP_GET_VARS and $HTTP_POST_VARS) request variable arrays for a value matching that name. Before it returns, it tries to strip extra slashes out of the value it found.

So for example, if I passed this HTTP request:

http://www.example.com/explain_function.php?key=value

then ran the function

get_param("key", "GET");

It would return "value".

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks , this really helped –  Ibn Saeed Jul 8 '09 at 17:08

It appears that is is trying to extract a value from the query string based on the name of the parameter. It is first checking to see if the $_POST variable is valid, and if not, check the $HTTP_POST_VARS. If either one of them are valid, it will return the value with the name of $param_name. For instance, if $param_name = "foo", it will check $_POST["foo"].

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.