Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to use z3 to convert a formula to CNF (using Tseitsin-style encoding)? I am looking for something like the simplify command, but guaranteeing that the returned formula is CNF.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can use the apply command for doing it. We can provide arbitrary tactics/strategies to this command. For more information about tactics and strategies in Z3 4.0, check the tutorial http://rise4fun.com/Z3/tutorial/strategies

The command (help-tactic) can be used to display all available tactics in Z3 4.0 and their parameters. The programmatic is more convenient to use and flexible. Here is a tutorial based on the new Python API: http://rise4fun.com/Z3Py/tutorial/strategies. The same capabilities are available in the .Net and C/C++ APIs.

The following script demonstrates how to convert a formula into CNF using this framework:

http://rise4fun.com/Z3/TEu6

share|improve this answer
    
Great, thanks! That is exactly what I was loooking for. Just one more remark: Is there also a way to get z3 to tell me the function each of the new variables (k!0, k!1, ...) represents? Or do I have to "reverse engineer" that from the Tseitin-axioms? –  Georg Jun 12 '12 at 14:19
    
No, we do not provide this information. However, Z3 produces a "model converter" for every preprocessing step. A model converter is a function that converts the model for the resultant formula, into a model for the original formula. For CNF conversion, the model converter is simple. It just removes the interpretation of the new variables k!0, k!1, ... Thus, it does not provide the information you want. –  Leonardo de Moura Jun 13 '12 at 3:31
    
Ok, thanks a lot anyway. Reconstructing the function for the new variables from the Tseitin axioms seems to be fairly straightforward anyway. –  Georg Jun 13 '12 at 5:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.